The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

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Sut
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Sut » January 16th, 2017, 4:13 pm

Been looking at some excellent home brew home computer conversions of classic arcade, console games.

Came across this eye catching version of Sega's classic Space Harrier on the Atari 8-bit line. Perhaps worth Critics time getting it running on his XEGS.

http://www.atarimania.com/game-atari-40 ... 28586.html

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scotland
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland » March 1st, 2017, 5:55 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wDtxYeJdzg

Just an amusing video on 'Old Computers did it Better'. For instance, how to you exit an application? Turn off power, turn on power, system back on...just that quick.

Seriously though, the old manuals were pretty awesome. A recent computer I bought came with a quick install guide and some warranty information, and I think that was it.

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scotland
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland » March 29th, 2017, 7:34 pm

Remember the Z80 based Tandy Radio Shack computer, the TRS-80 ?

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/03/29/trs80_emulator/

The TRS-80 (model III) has a new emulator called "Sharp 80". Yeah!

I don't own a TRS-80, but a model is very likely first computer I put fingers to keyboard on to learn BASIC. I can still remember a turn based game trying to safely guide a lunar lander down by typing in how much fuel you were expending in various thrusters. I bet I can find it in one of my old BASIC books still. A friend had one (Maybe a model III later) and I got to play there too before I had a computer of my own later. I would be nice to explore what it could do again.

Unfortunately, clicking through to the site (moc.08prahs.www backwards) with the actual emulator gives my browser the 'Danger Danger Will Robinson' message, so I'll see if it gets put on safer sites before trying my luck.

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scotland
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland » April 22nd, 2017, 12:09 pm

goldenband wrote: BTW is the C64 the only system for which you plan to have an in-house guest reviewer? I'm wondering if someday there'll be an Apple II Critic or Amiga Critic under your aegis.


These old computer systems still have fanbases and more than that, creative hobbyists making homebrew games and better still - new hardware to open up the libraries. I just got a hobbyist made 32k RAM expansion for my TI99/4a for about the price of a typical game. I've picked up stuff for several old systems this year for reasonable prices.

Beyond the games and hardware, emulators continue to be made. Its really a nice time to be adventuring in the world of 80s family computers. Some systems like the C64 have strong communities like lemon64.com, but others, like the TI99 really don't outside of Atariage forums (that I know of, anyway).

goldenband
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby goldenband » April 22nd, 2017, 12:58 pm

scotland wrote:
goldenband wrote: BTW is the C64 the only system for which you plan to have an in-house guest reviewer? I'm wondering if someday there'll be an Apple II Critic or Amiga Critic under your aegis.


These old computer systems still have fanbases and more than that, creative hobbyists making homebrew games and better still - new hardware to open up the libraries. I just got a hobbyist made 32k RAM expansion for my TI99/4a for about the price of a typical game. I've picked up stuff for several old systems this year for reasonable prices.

Beyond the games and hardware, emulators continue to be made. Its really a nice time to be adventuring in the world of 80s family computers. Some systems like the C64 have strong communities like lemon64.com, but others, like the TI99 really don't outside of Atariage forums (that I know of, anyway).


Trying to wrap my head around the fact that you replied here to my post from a different thread...?! :? :mrgreen:

But in any event, yes, I've been enjoying my CoCo lately (mainly Dungeons of Daggorath), and have in some ways felt more drawn to the 1980s computers than to my consoles, for whatever reason. I need to bust out my C64 again sometime soon...

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scotland
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland » April 22nd, 2017, 1:14 pm

goldenband wrote: Trying to wrap my head around the fact that you replied here to my post from a different thread...?! :? :mrgreen:

But in any event, yes, I've been enjoying my CoCo lately (mainly Dungeons of Daggorath), and have in some ways felt more drawn to the 1980s computers than to my consoles, for whatever reason. I need to bust out my C64 again sometime soon...


Did not want the perception of applying for Vic20 critic or anything, so did a little sleight of hand on the post. Didn't bear on the review, but more meta.

I have not ever played a CoCo, but glad you are enjoying it. I too am having fun exploring these libraries of late. Lots of fun stuff.Maybe you can do a review on Daggorath?

gametime
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby gametime » May 27th, 2017, 8:52 am

Alucard1191 wrote:Since I'm on apparently chatty, what ever happened to the idea of "carrying a character(s) though multiple games?" Wizardry of course does it, but you could do that with Baldur's Gate, Shining Force 3 in theory, etc. (dang Japanese only releases) That seems to have gone the wayside. There isn't a Dues Ex, Bioshock, or Fallout game where you could import a character with power bonuses and whatnot from a previous game. Is that just not a cool thing to do anymore?


Wondered that myself. On the Commodore 64 the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons games allowed you to transfer characters. Buck Rodgers Countdown to Doomsday was another. I used to play through then add the my characters to a new game. They released a Buck Rodgers sequel for the early IBM compatibles but never for the C64. I was stoked by the Sega Genesis release but ultimately the game was very watered down.

Great feature that has long been forgotten.

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scotland
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland » August 8th, 2017, 7:21 pm

Hobbyists keep making retro-computer gaming better all the time.

Here is an add-on I might get for the Commodore 64 so you can use a NES (or SNES) controller. Oddly, while the Genesis controller would plug in to the C64, there is concern it might short a chip. To use a Genesis controller safely, you might want one of these. While I love the Genesis, I think a NES controller might be the best fit for C64 games if you don't want a joystick. One of these will run you about $25.

https://www.64hdd.com/64jpx/64jpx.html

jon
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby jon » August 10th, 2017, 2:21 pm

That's really interesting about using video game controllers for computer games. I thoroughly enjoyed the 8-bit home computer generation; there were so many great games.

Sut
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Sut » October 30th, 2017, 5:06 pm

I have been spending some time with the Miner Willy series. Still fun (and tough) games.

They are platform games, but also puzzle games (sort of). Requiring you to figure out each screen and how best to clear them whilst collecting the items.

Emulation is definitely the way to go here though. The games are extremely tough and probably to frustrating for modern tastes.
Games were just not designed to be beaten during this era. They desperately need a password or level select system. Thankfully emulators now provide save states which makes the games less hair pullingly frustrating.

You’re probably aware of the 3 main games in the series: Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy 1&2.

However thanks to the wonders of emulation I’ve been playing some ‘side story’ games in the series.

The Perils of Willy (Vic 20).
This game is exclusive to the Vic 20 (Scotland you might want to check it out ?). Apparently they couldn’t get the original to fit on the Vic 20 so they created this game. Not as devious as the main entries but still has that ‘one more go’ feel to the levels.
Beware though the physics are way off from the Spectrum/C64 games. Willy has a Virtua Fighter style moon jump in Perils of Willy which is a little jarring after coming off the main games.
Also the colour pallete is much darker than the main series colourful levels. And the music sounds like something from a funeral rather than the relatively chirpy tunes of Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy.
If I was scoring it I would award it a C.

Manic Miner Extra Levels (Sam Coupé).
A rare and short lived British 8-bIt computer billed as a ‘super Spectrum’ didn’t last long but did play host to this official update of the original Manic Miner.
There are 3 level sets each containing 20 levels for a total of 60 levels hence my previous comment of needing a password feature.

The first level set is the originals levels with two sets of entirely new levels. The Sam Coupé’s additional colours and general horsepower (imagine a system somewhat between a C64 and a Master System) shows with a step up from the original games in visual presentation.

However the new levels were not designed by the original programmer Matthew Smith and subsequently are not as well designed. Again fun to play through via emulation.
Scored as a C+


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