Has interest in Atari 2600 collecting died?

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VideoGameCritic
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Has interest in Atari 2600 collecting died?

Postby VideoGameCritic » March 20th, 2015, 9:51 pm

I think the instructions are especially vital to Atari 2600 games, not only because it explains what the game is all about, but because you can see what the variations are.

Many have dozens of variations but in most cases the default (1) tends to be too easy and will bore most gamers.  I look for the most challenging variation.  You can usually find them in my reviews where it says "recommended variation".

scotland171
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Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

Has interest in Atari 2600 collecting died?

Postby scotland171 » March 21st, 2015, 8:41 am

[QUOTE=videogamecritic]I think the instructions are especially vital to Atari 2600 games, not only because it explains what the game is all about, but because you can see what the variations are...find them in my reviews where it says "recommended variation".[/QUOTE]

I agree whole heartedly. I will go a step further and say they also set the mood with their illustrations.

Its like music in other generations, or even early arcade cabinet art. Doesn't Adventure need its box art and manual to get in the mood...something the flashbacks ignore.

This is also true for other systems like the Odyssey 2 that failed at building in the many game variations found more commonly inn 2600 games. War of Nerves seems like a better game with the manual and box art.

Manuals certainly were important for more complicated control setups like the Intellivision, or family computers with keyboards and function keys, but even some 2600 games like Star Master had a complicated control scheme you probably would have needed information to figure out.


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