Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

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scotland
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Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby scotland » October 7th, 2017, 7:27 am

Seedi is another crowdfunded retro system, but this one designed to use optical discs such as the PS1, Sega CD and Turbografx CD. You can also load ROMs or get adapters for other systems. I did not see Sega Saturn or Dreamcast

https://liliputing.com/2017/10/seedi-retro-game-system-plays-cd-roms-crowdfunding.html

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/seedi-retro-gaming-system#/

seedi_01.jpg
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Sut
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Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby Sut » October 7th, 2017, 7:54 am

I do like the sound and look of these retro consoles and this on in particular looks cool. But I just cannot escape the feeling that I can just plug my laptop in the TV and use those emulators.

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VideoGameCritic
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Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby VideoGameCritic » October 7th, 2017, 8:02 pm

I would really like to see these succeed, because disk-based systems are usually far less durable that solid-state machines like the 2600 and NES. In 10 years we'll be glad to have something like this.

pacman000
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Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby pacman000 » October 12th, 2017, 1:45 pm

This post at AtariAge caught my eye:

This Seedi thing is someone's low-cost interpretation and variation on a homebrew emulation rig that is trying to appeal to all. You're paying for the time and assembly and configuration work really. It's nothing you can't do yourself if so motivated. You can build them on the cheap, less than $100. Or be elegant and sophisticated with high class hardware. Anodized metallic keyboard, automotive grade case finish, joystick/flightstick with all metal construction. Dual m.2 drives. SuperCapacitor 3 minute battery backup. The options are limitless.

So with Seedi you're essentially paying for the cheap hardware and a bit extra for someone to bring it all together for you. Sounds reasonable to me.
http://atariage.com/forums/topic/270611-seedi-yet-another-emulation-box-perhaps-good-enough/?p=3860470

I can agree with this sentiment. Think of early home computers. Sure, you could buy a S-100 based kit, put it together yourself, customize it, get it to your specs, etc. But it was much easier to buy a fully assembled Apple II.

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scotland
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Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby scotland » October 12th, 2017, 4:46 pm

You're paying for the time and assembly and configuration work really


This thing actually reads optical discs from different systems, which is not something I've seen before. So, that's more than time, assembly and configuration, in that this is something new (to me, at least) above even a PC. As far as I know, I can't insert a Sega CD into a PC and emulate it off the disc. (or can I?)

Also, we have three families here:
* Do it yourself products as this AtariAge commenter suggests and play ROMS you unearthed on the internet
* Buy one of these retro unit consoles from hobbyist groups like this Seedi, that can play legitimate game media (and ROMS)
* Buy one of these retro units from a larger company, like Nintendo, often with a limited but legal game selection

We've seen lots of the middle tier - hobbyist (or small company) products from companies like Hyperkin (using both hardware and software emulation) and this crowdfunded start ups. These are the ones the commenter is saying we are paying for time, assembly and configuration. I think there is a bit more here. The configuration may not be trivial, in that they should have chosen components (or designed some unique ones) and designed a unit eith an expert eye toward things like adequate cooling and performance. Assembly is not always easy either, as someone who has failed to complete a few mods in his day. There is also a need for quality checking the assembly and redressing flaws that are found - that's a big plus.

While the commenter may have included OS in 'configuration', that's not trivial either. They need to build a user friendly operating system requiring minimal learning across a range of technical skill sets, and put it all together in some eye pleasing way. For this Seedi thing, there are controllers involved too. They may also need to select and acquire rights to a set of programs to help sell the product. Then there are rounds of testing, possibly with minor redesigns and firmware updates as well.

I'm glad we have this middle tier.

matmico399
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Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby matmico399 » October 13th, 2017, 8:12 am

I think I'm in on this one.

Wallyworld
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Joined: July 13th, 2015, 11:11 am

Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby Wallyworld » October 14th, 2017, 8:36 am

scotland wrote:
You're paying for the time and assembly and configuration work really


This thing actually reads optical discs from different systems, which is not something I've seen before. So, that's more than time, assembly and configuration, in that this is something new (to me, at least) above even a PC. As far as I know, I can't insert a Sega CD into a PC and emulate it off the disc. (or can I?)

Also, we have three families here:
* Do it yourself products as this AtariAge commenter suggests and play ROMS you unearthed on the internet
* Buy one of these retro unit consoles from hobbyist groups like this Seedi, that can play legitimate game media (and ROMS)
* Buy one of these retro units from a larger company, like Nintendo, often with a limited but legal game selection

We've seen lots of the middle tier - hobbyist (or small company) products from companies like Hyperkin (using both hardware and software emulation) and this crowdfunded start ups. These are the ones the commenter is saying we are paying for time, assembly and configuration. I think there is a bit more here. The configuration may not be trivial, in that they should have chosen components (or designed some unique ones) and designed a unit eith an expert eye toward things like adequate cooling and performance. Assembly is not always easy either, as someone who has failed to complete a few mods in his day. There is also a need for quality checking the assembly and redressing flaws that are found - that's a big plus.
.


Scotland I have a modded original Xbox with all emulators installed. On the main menu for most cd based consoles there is an option that says insert disc. I've tested it and it will run my cd games from the disc. I didn't put my emulator box together but I don't see a difference between that and this seedi console. Other than having tens of thousands of roms already installed.

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scotland
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Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby scotland » October 14th, 2017, 11:04 am

Wallyworld wrote: Scotland I have a modded original Xbox with all emulators installed. On the main menu for most cd based consoles there is an option that says insert disc. I've tested it and it will run my cd games from the disc. I didn't put my emulator box together but I don't see a difference between that and this seedi console. Other than having tens of thousands of roms already installed.


Thanks for the good information. Maybe this has no more functionality that a modded original Xbox.

pacman000
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Joined: December 30th, 2015, 9:04 am

Re: Seedi Optical Disc Retro System

Postby pacman000 » October 14th, 2017, 11:16 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_cont ... 52vcspkHMk

A pre-release review from MetalJesus at AtariAge.


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