The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

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scotland171
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Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland171 » February 12th, 2015, 10:15 pm

[QUOTE=C64_Critic]     I think whether you fall into the C64 crowd or the ZX Spectrum fan base seems to depend almost entirely on what you actually played as a youngster. [/QUOTE]

Bummer.   A three day weekend, spent some money, got myself psyched up, and my C64 died [cue mournful bugle].   Now I am in that sunk cost dilemma.   Do I take my life lesson and move on, or run where the angels fear to tread? Unlike the 8 bit consoles (even my Colecovision runs like a champ), this is not the first C64 I have had to bury.  You lift up the hood on these things and its a lot more complex than the consoles of the time.   Most of the units sold on auction sites are untested at best.   From a reliability engineering point of view, to expect an inexpensive consumer starter computer with a board that full of components to still be functioning 30 years later...well...I think I may just be at the far right hand side of that bathtub curve of product life.

If I do plunge back in for a new computer, there is another issue. The Commodore 64 has sort of a 2.0 version in the Commodore 128.  Supposedly it has excellent backwards compatibility (not emulation, real hardware compatibility) in its C64 mode, plus it has various improvements.  Anything you can do I can do better, I can do anything better than you. 

Here's the kicker.  As a youngster I had the C64, not a C128.   Looking at the 128 is a bit alien.  Like Zachary Quinto as Spock...its a bit too Stepford Wife.   So, its not even C64 vs Spectrum, its gotta be a real C64. 



Sut1
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Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Sut1 » February 13th, 2015, 5:26 am

Pfft ! You never hear of the good old British Speccy giving up after 30+ years ! I kid of course.

Personally from experience as I'm now on my third Atari ST (I still have my original Spectrum from when I was 8 years old - still going strong). The second ST I 'upgraded' to the STe version, over my original STfm model. But it's not the same it's like going with a girl who resembles your ex, but in your heart you know it's not your old flame. So when that gave up the ghost I picked up the STfm model again and fell back in love with it.

So if you want to experience something similar (but maybe better) then go for the C128, but if you want to rekindle your love get exactly the same C64 you grew up with (if you can). Also there is bound to be one of your favourite games or programs that won't be compatible with the 128 always the case. Personal preference of course.

As an aside (I'm not sure how the C64 was released out there in the colonies) but the C64 'c' is a durable beast so if your fine with going for another model perhaps hunt that iteration down.

Oltobaz1
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Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Oltobaz1 » February 13th, 2015, 5:54 am

The Atari St... One of my best friend's computer. I introduced the guy to console gaming through the NES, still, I discovered a few classics through the ST, like:

Rick Dangerous (legendary game)

Operation Wolf (looked great, then I discovered the arcade game)

Bubble Bobble (spent a lot of time with this one. Years later, I'd get the
Game Boy port, as well as others).

The Thundercats (not a classic, shame this wasn't brought to consoles though)

Golden Axe (was introduced first to the Master System, arcade System 16 and Mega Drive game first.
in that order. Decent port, which I'm only mentioning as a diehard Golden Axe fan).

Dragon Ninja (wouldn't try out the Famicom version and the arcade original till years).

Double Dragon (thought it looked and played good. Got the Game Boy and NES ports eventually, very different games).

Dungeon Master (iconic RPG)

Le Manoir de Mortevielle (amazing adventure game)

As far as 8 Bit computers, I can vouch for the Amstradt CPC 6128. Some great games. Never owned one till I stumbled upon a faulty unit
out in the street a few years ago. Another of my friends had this. I did purchase the console version, the GX 4000. Burnin Rubber, Robocop 2...
The system couldn't really compete with Sega and Nintendo ( was released at around the same time as the Mega Drive), it does have its merits though.

scotland171
Posts: 816
Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland171 » February 13th, 2015, 6:32 am

Sword of Omens!  There's a Thundercats game!   Well sell my soul to Mumm-Ra, I never knew that.    Give me sight beyond sight and tell me if there are any other classic cartoon video games I'm missing out on? Is there a Thundarr or a Space Ghost game?

It is neat to compare ports of various games.  Especially something as well known as Golden Axe.  Sega definitely did not feel the same way about its properties as Nintendo does, did it.  Golden Axe on the Atari ST...funny. 

Is Dungeon Master still enjoyable today, or only if you played it back in the 80s.  I find some of those 3D dungeon crawlers of the day to just be tedious (hello Double Dungeon on the TG-16).   

The girl who resembles your ex but isn't....and while I write that I see the Valentine's banner up top with Pac and Ms Pac falling in love.  Yeah...you got a point there.  Always looking for our lost Lenore.


Sut1
Posts: 789
Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Sut1 » February 13th, 2015, 1:23 pm

The Amstrad CPC range is a curious beast when utilised correctly it could through some impressive graphics around. More often than not though it got an half assed Spectrum port with minimal colour that also ran slower than the Spectrum equivalent.

I once had a GX4000 but it is horrendously expensive to collect for and I ended up selling it. It has got some decent games, but nothing that you couldn't get on the other 8-bit home computers. Burnin Rubber is WEC Le Mans in a different skin. Might be a system for me to revisit in the future.

Never really played Dungeon Master despite it being the ST's biggest game, I was never into RPG and only recently started trying them out. Probably one I need to pick up and spend some time with along with Elite.

Golden Axe, Shinobi, Shadow Dancer, Out Run, ESWAT, Super Monaco GP, Dynamite Dux and loads more Sega games are on the home computers it wasn't until the Mega Drive hit the big time that Sega got more protective over their games.

Golden Axe is a very good port, also if you ever get chance try Toki it's certainly better than the Genesis version both gameplay and graphics wise despite having a quarter of the on screen colours.
Almost anything by the Bitmap Brothers is outstanding on the Atari ST (and Amiga) the ports to consoles are butchered in comparison.

I have Thundercats for my Spectrum it's erm.... Interesting shall we say. Imagine Kung Fu master with swords and you won't be far away.

C64_Critic1
Posts: 78
Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby C64_Critic1 » February 14th, 2015, 12:17 pm

[QUOTE=scotland17]
Bummer.   A three day weekend, spent some money, got myself psyched up, and my C64 died [cue mournful bugle].   Now I am in that sunk cost dilemma.   Do I take my life lesson and move on, or run where the angels fear to tread? Unlike the 8 bit consoles (even my Colecovision runs like a champ), this is not the first C64 I have had to bury.  You lift up the hood on these things and its a lot more complex than the consoles of the time.   Most of the units sold on auction sites are untested at best.   From a reliability engineering point of view, to expect an inexpensive consumer starter computer with a board that full of components to still be functioning 30 years later...well...I think I may just be at the far right hand side of that bathtub curve of product life.

If I do plunge back in for a new computer, there is another issue. The Commodore 64 has sort of a 2.0 version in the Commodore 128.  Supposedly it has excellent backwards compatibility (not emulation, real hardware compatibility) in its C64 mode, plus it has various improvements.  Anything you can do I can do better, I can do anything better than you. 

Here's the kicker.  As a youngster I had the C64, not a C128.   Looking at the 128 is a bit alien.  Like Zachary Quinto as Spock...its a bit too Stepford Wife.   So, its not even C64 vs Spectrum, its gotta be a real C64. 


[/QUOTE]

     Scotland, reading your post caused a light bulb to go off in my head - I had completely forgotten that quite awhile ago I told you I'd dig up some old/extra C64 stuff I thought might be stuffed under my basement stairs to give to you, but then never followed up.  I greatly apologize for that!  I'm going to PM you again as I just finished digging through my basement stairs and came up with a working, original in-the-box C64 breadbox along with a working floppy and all power cords and connectors.  It looks like it's practically brand-new, and I tested it out to ensure it was working.  The only thing I don't have is a video out cable, but I'm assuming you still have a working one of those.  Hopefully we can meet up one day this week or next and I can hand this stuff off to you if you still wish it.
Sorry!

Sut1
Posts: 789
Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Sut1 » March 4th, 2015, 8:30 am

http://spectralinterlude.com

Homebrew Spectrum Castlevania game, looks great !
I'll let you know how it plays once I've downloaded it and got it running on my real hardware.

Turbosega-16
Posts: 6
Joined: April 12th, 2015, 1:22 pm

Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Turbosega-16 » April 20th, 2015, 4:44 pm

I just sold my Atari XE Game Sytem on eBay today. I couldn't believe how much they sell for now. I paid $45 about 2 years ago and that was around the selling price then. I was stunned as it sold today for $140. It was not even complete in box it was the game console with keyboard and the 2 games that come with it. The demand for these have skyrocketed. Not sure why... I honestly never played it which is why I sold it.

I just listed my TI 99/4a today on ebay today. I put a BIN for $99. It's complete with box foam and voice synthesizer and 2 games munch man and TI invaders and controllers. If someone on here is interested in it I'll throw in a bunch of other accessories for it.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/131492227934?ss ... 1555.l2649

Thanks,

Wallyworld

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Rev
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Joined: April 7th, 2015, 7:31 pm

Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby Rev » May 3rd, 2015, 4:59 pm

Turbosega-16 wrote:I just sold my Atari XE Game Sytem on eBay today. I couldn't believe how much they sell for now. I paid $45 about 2 years ago and that was around the selling price then. I was stunned as it sold today for $140. It was not even complete in box it was the game console with keyboard and the 2 games that come with it. The demand for these have skyrocketed. Not sure why... I honestly never played it which is why I sold it.

Wallyworld


I have an Atari XEGS as well and I finally got the thing hooked up to my tv and playing. It has been just sitting in a box in my closet for close to two years. I remember I bought mine for like $35 or something like that. I like the console but the controller is terrible. Thank goodness Sega Genesis controllers work for it because that is mostly how I play my games for it. I really only play the console for maybe 10-15 minutes at a time, once in a while. I bought the console because I didn't want anything too primitive, like the Atari 2600, because I just can't get into the games. This is a step up from a lot of those games and the graphics are definitely better. I never owned an Atari computer so the fact that something like this exists is pretty neat. I believe it is the oldest console I own.

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scotland
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Re: The 8-bit Home Computer Users Thread

Postby scotland » August 8th, 2015, 9:06 am

I have been reading some old books and magazines, and even trying the old type in BASIC programs. Some are machine specific, but there are some BASIC programs freely available online and .bas files (which are just txt files with a bas extension).

I know this is mostly a console crowd, as evidenced by how often the NES is credited as being an originator of things like video game storytelling despite years of mainframe / microcomputer games, but be fun to have early computer talk.

I never learned assembly, but learning BASIC was fun.


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