Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Talk about music, movies, television, books, and other media. No religious or political discussion allowed.
Vexer6
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby Vexer6 » July 16th, 2015, 1:23 am

Well to me his vocals sound very monotonous, I for one prefer vocalists that use a bit more melody and don't just do mindless screaming(which is primarily the reason i'm not that big on death metal, as I find many DM vocalists indistinguishable from one another and I can barely understand what they're saying half the time) like Phil often does, I honestly think the band's first vocalist Terry Glaze was superior, his vocals were much more my style.

I can admire Pantera for being successful in the grunge era(a genre I hate BTW, bands like Nirvana are so overrated it's not even funny) but I still don't think they're quite as amazing as people made them out to b( I don't get why people call Phil the "new metal god", that's certainly not how I would describe him)

A friend of mine who actually happens to be in a metal band(Scott Waters of Ultimatum, who has his own website, NoLifeTilMetal.com) agrees with me on Pantera.

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scotland
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby scotland » July 16th, 2015, 8:42 am

velcrozombie wrote:...Columbia House - 12 cassettes for a penny!...I also torrented a lot of music starting in about 2003 and continuing up until around 2012 or so; I probably have somewhere around 500 gigs of downloaded music, plus all the CDs... ...Youtube to hear new music; Spotify and Pandora aren't really options right now...As a kid I used at least 50 percent of any money I got on mostly new cassettes and (starting around 1995) CDs; last year I bought one new album, and I don't see myself buying more than 2 or 3 this year...or going to concerts (which I used to do all the time) and buying T-shirts.


Sorry for chopping your post, but the diversity is awesome. The biz changes, but behind the change is a lot of stability. Vinyl lasted so long that many kids could play their parents albums from when they were kids. 8 tracks and reel to reel were brief, but led to the long lived cassette and the mix tape and taping off the radio. You did not mention radio, but FM music was big for decades too. You can still pht in 25 year old CDs in a modern player no problem. Even mp3 has been around awhile now.

Albums seem to be gone, a victim of itunes mostly (though apple will say it was piracy killed the album). Cover art too. Mtv music videos. Yet now we have gigs of music on our phone, podcasts, satellite radio, pandora and more.

I do miss the album though. First time I really paid attention to music was as an album, even though the songs were familiar (it was Beatles Sgt Pepper, on cassette)

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velcrozombie
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby velcrozombie » July 16th, 2015, 11:16 am

scotland wrote:Sorry for chopping your post, but the diversity is awesome. The biz changes, but behind the change is a lot of stability. Vinyl lasted so long that many kids could play their parents albums from when they were kids. 8 tracks and reel to reel were brief, but led to the long lived cassette and the mix tape and taping off the radio. You did not mention radio, but FM music was big for decades too. You can still pht in 25 year old CDs in a modern player no problem. Even mp3 has been around awhile now.

Albums seem to be gone, a victim of itunes mostly (though apple will say it was piracy killed the album). Cover art too. Mtv music videos. Yet now we have gigs of music on our phone, podcasts, satellite radio, pandora and more.

I do miss the album though. First time I really paid attention to music was as an album, even though the songs were familiar (it was Beatles Sgt Pepper, on cassette)


My best friend from my current workplace is a vinyl collector and he has a stereo room for all his music. He puts aside at least one block a time a week of three or four hours to just listen to records and chill out. One nice thing is that most (if not all) records these days come with a free download code so that you can have the music on the go, and whenever I see Marty on break he's listening to his collection on his IPhone. I still enjoy listening to full albums myself, but it usually ends up being while I do my shopping, cleaning or mowing the lawn. Admittedly I probably listen as much to podcasts these days as I do albums - especially Marc Maron's WTF podcast, which just received a large spike in listeners after Maron interviewed Barack Obama recently.

In an interview that the AVClub did with Rob Zombie a couple of years ago about Zombie's love of silent movies ( http://www.avclub.com/article/rob-zombi ... ies-104943 ), Zombie talked about how different it was watching TV as a kid in the 70s when there were very few choices and how that ended up being a blessing in disguise; since he couldn't instantly turn to hundreds of under channels, he would sit through things like Charlie Chaplin shorts and Marx Brothers movies that he may have otherwise turned off. Being stuck with an album or movie that you don't understand immediately because you don't have the resources to acquire something else puts you in a position where you listen or watch repeatedly until you can grab a foothold somewhere. For me it was things like The White Album, The Downward Spiral by Nine Inch Nails or The Modern Dance by Pere Ubu - you just listened until you felt that the block had dissolved, that something had been revealed to you.

Vexer6 wrote:I can admire Pantera for being successful in the grunge era(a genre I hate BTW, bands like Nirvana are so overrated it's not even funny) but I still don't think they're quite as amazing as people made them out to b( I don't get why people call Phil the "new metal god", that's certainly not how I would describe him)


How do you feel about Alice in Chains or Soundgarden? Aren't they basically arty metal bands, even if they get lumped in the grunge genre? Chris Cornell was my standard for hard rock/metal vocals for a long time, probably because he had more body and low-end than a lot of the more classic metal vocalists (Halford, Dickenson, Dio, King Diamond, etc.). It took me a long time to accept the more operatic metal style, and I still prefer the more midrange sound of someone like James Hetfield or Bon Scott (even though I realize that someone like Dickenson is technically a better singer).

Vexer6
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby Vexer6 » July 16th, 2015, 4:42 pm

There are certain Soundgarden and Alice in Chains songs that I don't mind listening to, but for the most part their catalog leaves me cold, and I don't like Pearl Jam one bit, they bore me to tears. Cornell is definitely not my standard for vocalists, I find him to be a rather meh vocalist(out of all the James Bond theme songs, Cornell's is pretty much the only one that I found completely forgettable), my standard for hard rock/metal vocalists is definitely Rob Halford. I tend to really like those high-pitched falsetto type vocals.

LoganRuckman
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby LoganRuckman » July 16th, 2015, 7:50 pm

That's interesting that you don't like Alice In Chains, Pearl Jam, or Nirvana, but like Nickelback. I mean, to me, Nickelback always sounded like what would happen if you mixed Nirvana and AIC, throw a little Pearl Jam in the mix, and then severely watered down the sound. Not trying to hate. Actually, I'd like to see you elaborate on this.

@Velcrozombie Dirt and Superunknown are two of my favorite metal, as well as grunge and alternative albums of all time.

Vexer6
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby Vexer6 » July 16th, 2015, 10:53 pm

Personally I don't hear much in the way of similarities between those bands, maybe with their earlier albums like Curb and The State, but anything from Silver Side Up onwards sounds nothing at all like Nirvana or AIC to me.

Bonfire is my all time favorite band, with Fireworks and Point Blank being two of my all time favorite albums.

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velcrozombie
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby velcrozombie » July 17th, 2015, 12:20 am

LoganRuckman wrote: Dirt and Superunknown are two of my favorite metal, as well as grunge and alternative albums of all time.


My man! I think Superunknown is my favorite rock record from that time period, with Dirt fairly close behind. In case you haven't listened to it yet, Jar of Flies makes a great companion to Dirt; while Dirt is unremittingly dark and despairing, Jar of Flies is more moody and has some moments of beauty and even levity. The two new AiC albums with William DuVall are solid, but the level of emotion that Staley brought to the older material is sorely missed. All of Soundgarden's other albums are worth a listen, especially Badmotorfinger, but I wouldn't bother with the new one (King Animal) until you've already heard everything else.

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scotland
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Re: Music Biz - Streaming, Piracy, itunes

Postby scotland » July 17th, 2015, 8:59 am

velcrozombie wrote: In an interview that the AVClub did with Rob Zombie a couple of years ago about Zombie's love of silent movies, Zombie talked about how different it was watching TV as a kid in the 70s when there were very few choices and how that ended up being a blessing in disguise; since he couldn't instantly turn to hundreds of under channels, he would sit through things like Charlie Chaplin shorts and Marx Brothers movies that he may have otherwise turned off.


Zombie's opinion has merit. Many TV channels of the day bought their programming, and so they reached back into the vaults for various 'Matinee' movies. I continue to meet people that have only watched movies made in their lifetime, but growing up the 70s introduced you to movies from decades earlier. Whether it was old Creature Feature movies, or Humphrey Bogart or Cary Grant movies, you watched them. You were not making a conscious effort to be a film fan, that's what was on.

This was also a reason why The Three Stooges sunk its teeth into a generation, decades after the shorts were already made. Same thing for the Looney Tunes cartoons, before parental advocates became vocal on falling anvils and slapstick that these kind of shows became Persona non Grata. Shame. I miss the Three Stooges.

Also, since many families only had a single television, you watched old movies or TV together as a family. Popular TV shows were watched by a huge percentage of homes, which is why the finale of M*A*S*H remains one of the most watched shows ever.

For music though, I think 70s really don't compare to modern musical options. Many areas only had a few stations, and you'd better like what they put on the air.

For video games, having small choice - such as only having an NES console and a handful of expensive cartridges, you played them alot and appreciated the difficulty as being a challenge. You learn the levels, you beat the bosses, you become the master of the game. Nowadays, with so many ways to play, so many games, well, maybe that is a reason why people say modern games are too easy and hold your hand.


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