VGC Mobile
system main

Title Range: F-L

Fantasy Zone
Grade: B+
Publisher: Sega (1986)
Reviewed: 2009/1/25

screenshotIn stark contrast to the serious side-scrolling shooters of the mid-1980's, Fantasy Zone strikes a whimsical chord with cartoonish aliens, playful music, and ultra-bright colors. Some gamers may be irritated by the cute, pastel style, but Fantasy Zone's underlying gameplay is no joke. Your small, bullet-shaped ship is very nimble, and I like how it sprouts little feet when running along the planet surface. You can fire shots as fast as you can tap the fire button, and the second button lets you drop bombs. Each side-scrolling stage contains several large, stationary aliens that must be defeated in order to initiate a boss encounter. Zany enemies come in all forms, from green fish to blue blobs to rotating flowers. Honestly, I can't even tell what most of those things are supposed to be. When defeated, baddies drop bouncing coins which can be snatched up and used to purchase weapon, bomb, and speed upgrades. You'll certainly want to upgrade your firepower, since larger foes can absorb a lot of hits. I love the seven-way shot weapon, but the smart bomb isn't quite as devastating as I would like (it won't destroy larger foes). Avoid the speed upgrades because they make your ship very hard to guide with precision. The difficulty is up there, and the collision detection won't cut you any slack. Sometimes you'll think you're in the clear, only to have a wayward rotating missile clip your wing and send you to day-glow heaven. Fantasy Zone's graphic quality is pretty amazing, with a screen resolution that seems higher than most Master System games. The colors are remarkably vibrant and the scenery looks crisp and well defined. When destroyed, your ship bursts into a nice pattern of snowflakes. I appreciate Fantasy Zone's novel approach, and shooter fans should welcome the change of pace. © Copyright 2009 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


new Galaxy Force
Grade: F
Publisher: Sega (1989)
Reviewed: 2014/4/22


screenshotMuch like Afterburner (Sega, 1987) and Space Harrier (Sega, 1987), Galaxy Force tries to render 3D-ish graphics on the Master System with disastrous results. This is horrible! The scaling enemies and behind-the-ship view were clearly too much for the hardware to handle. Galaxy Force is Afterburner-in-space, and even features the same weapons. One button fires your machine gun while the other unleashes guided missiles at "locked on" targets. The red lock-on indicators only appear briefly, so by the time you launch it's often too late. Fortunately your cannon is pretty effective and you can hold down the button to shoot continuously. The graphics are a mess. Not only do the enemies scale abruptly into view, but when objects overlap unsightly visual glitches occur. It's hard to tell when you're taking hits with all the junk on the screen, and your shield indicator was designed by a moron. It's a symbol of a red ship surrounded by a constantly flashing circle. WTF? The best aspect of the game is the ability to select from one of four stages. The first is set in open space, and the others let you glide over planets of molten lava, windy deserts, and striped meadows. About half-way through each stage you'll fly through a psychedelic tunnel with enough flashing lights to trigger an epileptic seizure. Trying to navigate these narrow corridors is futile, even with the un-helpful prompts like "turn left!" One crash brings your game to an abrupt - and merciful - conclusion. Your score isn't even displayed until the end of the game. The only thing good about Galaxy Force is that it makes Galaxy Force II (Genesis, 1992) seem a lot less awful. © Copyright 2014 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 20,700
1 player 


Gangster Town
Grade: A
Publisher: Sega (1989)
Reviewed: 2003/4/25

screenshotGangster Town has everything you'd want in a light gun game - challenge, variety, and superb graphics. As a member of the FBI, you engage in a series of exciting gangster shootouts. Each stage provides fresh scenery and a new challenge. The first level is a practice round that adjusts the difficulty of the game depending of how much skill you exhibit. The next stage is a car chase that lets you shoot gangsters hanging out the windows while a plane drops bombs from above. You can even shoot out the tires for bonus points. The subsequent stages, which take place on a city street, a saloon, a nightclub and a dock, are more conventional but still very challenging and fun. When gangsters get shot, they turn into transparent, rising angels, and you can even shoot down the angels! You can also take aim at bottles on the wall of the saloon, and even mice that scamper across the floor (which turn into tiny mice-angels, of course). Then there's the bonus stage that features a hidden key embedded in a multi-layered brick wall - it's a blast. Gangster Town also has a two-player simultaneous mode. The light gun control is fair, but it seems to register slightly to the right of where I aimed. Overall, this fantastic light gun game should not be missed. © Copyright 2003 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Ghost House
Grade: D-
Publisher: Sega (1986)
Reviewed: 2001/8/27

screenshotAll systems deserve to have one good, scary game, but Ghost House isn't scary OR good. It's just a generic platform game with stupid-looking, cartoon monsters. The ghosts look a lot like Kirby of Nintendo fame, which is not a good sign! Your job is to collect the five "family jewels" by defeating five Draculas. Five Draculas? That should set off some alarms right there. And guess how you defeat these five vampires? A wooden stake? Garlic? Holy water? Nah, you just punch them! C'mon, if you're going to make a game about vampires, you have to at least follow the rules! The game has no atmosphere at all and the music is as goofy as the graphics. Control isn't so hot either. Why do I keep falling through the floors?? Ghost House also features some annoying slow-down, and sometimes it will even freeze up for no reason. © Copyright 2001 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Ghostbusters
Grade: D+
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2010/3/2

screenshotI love the Ghostbusters film, but there was always something inherently un-fun about the Ghostbusters video game. This version falls more in line with the home computer editions, which means it's playable but far from great. The visuals are exceptionally rich, but only the most determined players will be able to stomach its monotonous - and difficult - gameplay. The game opens with one of those "follow-the-bouncing-ball" sing-alongs, but this rendition of the Ghostbusters theme is way off key! The main screen is comprised of city blocks, and it looks more colorful and detailed than what you'll find in other versions. You can actually see the little Gatekeeper and Keymaster characters wandering the streets! You select from four cars (including the hearse), which you then equip with gadgets like a PK energy sensor, ghost vacuum, and traps. As you cruise up the vertically-scrolling streets, elaborate building facades offer some nice scenery. That's good, because cruising between locations is a major part of the game. Fortunately your trips are mercifully short and you do not need to worry about gas. Upon arriving at a flashing city block (indicating PK activity), you'll see a new screen with up to five ghosts flying around the building exterior. The Ghostbuster dudes look sharp in their brown uniforms, and the translucent green "slimer" ghosts look pretty wild. Catching them is really the highlight of the game, but there's not a lot to it. Except for the slimers, most of the ghosts in this game look like flying bananas. Despite its eye candy and streamlined gameplay, Ghostbusters is still confusing and repetitive. I got sick of returning to my headquarters to empty my traps, and that off-key music drove me nuts. This Master System version of Ghostbusters is better than most, but frankly, that's not saying much. © Copyright 2010 The Video Game Critic.
Save mechanism: Password
1 player 


Ghouls 'N Ghosts
Grade: B+
Publisher: Sega (1990)
Reviewed: 2002/10/8

screenshotThis is a good example of some of the excellent games released for the Master System near the end its lifecycle. At first glance, you could easily mistake this game for the Genesis version. The graphics are crisp and detailed, and the gameplay is just like the arcade (including the huge bosses). The renaissance music is outstanding. Only some slowdown and graphic breakup mar an otherwise superb game playing experience. As your knight makes his way through graveyards, villages, and caves, danger lurks at every turn. Ghouls 'n Ghost's most distinguishing feature is its difficulty, and this version is no different. It seems like every one of those chests contains that evil magician who turns you into a chicken or an old man. At times it's insanely difficult. There are unlimited continues, and you'll find yourself playing into the wee hours of the morning if you're really bent on beating this game. © Copyright 2002 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 


Global Defense
Grade: C+
Publisher: Sega (1988)
Reviewed: 2000/11/14

screenshotHey look, it's Missile Command for the Sega Master System! There's no question that Global Defense borrows heavily from that classic, but it adds a few unique twists. You control a satellite in space. Your control alternates between the satellite and a crosshair, depending on which button you hold down. You don't shoot enemies directly; your missiles create explosions that take out anything nearby. The explosions don't last long (like Missile Command explosions), but you can unleash a series of them at once (hold down the button for rapid fire). The game alternates between an offensive stage and a defensive stage. During the offensive stage, you destroy as many enemy ships as you can while avoiding their onslaught. The defensive stage only requires you to shoot down missiles approaching a planet's surface. The graphics are nice, and a different planet is featured in the background of each stage. The space shuttle that picks you up after you complete a stage is a nice touch. The background music has a computer/space theme, and it's not too annoying. Global Defense isn't a classic, but it's fun to play for a while. © Copyright 2000 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 


Golden Axe
Grade: A-
Publisher: Sega (1989)
Reviewed: 2003/4/25

screenshotThis late-arriving Master System game pushes the system to the limit. The title screen is astonishing, and the in-game graphics are only a notch below the Genesis version. The scenery and spells are less spectacular in this edition, but the characters are large and very well detailed. All the major elements of the game are here, like the animals you can ride and the tiny trolls you can hack at for magic potions. I was especially impressed by the look of the animals and skeletons. The inspired music is also very similar to the Genesis. The only aspect of the game that truly suffers is the animation - it's somewhat choppy and lining up your man with enemies can be a bit tricky. The options are also a bit thin. You can only control the Conan-like Tarik (no woman or dwarf), although you can select from three types of magic. But the biggest omission has to be the disappointing lack of a two-player mode. Despite these shortcomings, Golden Axe still makes for a very satisfying one player experience. © Copyright 2003 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 


Great Baseball
Grade: F
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2004/4/18

screenshotThere seems to be an easy method to determine which games are good on the Sega Master System. If the title begins with "Great", that means it sucks. On the other hand, if it doesn't flaunt itself as being great, it's probably very good. "Awful Baseball" would have been a more honest title for this one. At first glance, the game appears to have a lot going for it. The pitcher/batter screen is similar to Bases Loaded on the NES, with a TV-style view from behind the pitcher, and it controls as good as it looks. Unfortunately, once the ball is put into play the whole game goes to hell in a handbasket. The screen switches to a view of the whole field, where the fielders move slow as molasses. It's like controlling a team of 90-year-old men, only slower. The diamond doesn't look so hot either thanks to those stupid narrow dirt paths between the bases. Ironically, the field on the small "radar" screen looks far more realistic! The umpire makes audible calls, but some are really hard to make out amidst all the fuzz. When a foul ball is hit, he sounds like he's screaming like a maniac! The crowds sounds like a jumbo jet flying overhead, and for some reason they go NUTS over foul balls (which are painfully abundant by the way). Great Baseball is truly bad, but it does have something I've never seen in another baseball game - balks! I wish they would have put that misplaced effort into playtesting instead. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Great Basketball
Grade: F
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2009/1/25

screenshotFor those in the mood for an absolutely terrible basketball game, I'd recommend Great Basketball. Man, what a train wreck. The side-scrolling court is colorful and well-defined, but why in the [expletive] is it green? You can select from a set of International teams, but all of the players are Asian - wearing diapers no less! The ball moves much like a beach ball - slow and floaty. The physics is so insane that shots completely off-line (with no arc) magically get sucked into the hoop. On the bright side, players scurry quickly across the court, and I like how you shoot by releasing at the top of your jump. While you can't dunk per se, it does look like you're throwing the ball down when you shoot close to the basket. The mind boggling free-throw shooting mechanism is needlessly complex with too many moving parts. Throw-ins are also problematic because you often can't see who you're throwing to, resulting in a lot of high, up-for-grabs passes. That sucks, but what ultimately ruins the game are its unnecessary penalties. These are called completely at random, and even the act of catching the ball can draw a "charging" foul. Oh well, at least the games are short. The non-stop background music and fuzzy voice synthesis fall squarely into the "so bad they're good" category. I like the cheerleaders on the sidelines, even though they are larger than the players and resemble the cavemen from the Geico commercials. At half-time there's a modest little show, but it's still more than what you'll see in any modern basketball game. There's definitely some old-school charm here, but with gameplay this erratic it would take a massive dose of nostalgia just to make Great Basketball seem... good. © Copyright 2009 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Great Football
Grade: F
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2005/12/13

screenshotHere's another perfectly awful sports game for the Master System. Great Football's bright, colorful graphics might have been appealing in 1987, but its gameplay has aged poorly. I recently played this against my old friend Eric who is also a long-time Master System fan. We had a great time - making fun of this, that is. I'm not sure which league Sega licensed for Great Football, but the teams include the Beavers, Bombers, Sharks, and everybody's favorite, the Dukes. The controls are remarkably unintuitive. The play selection screen forces you to sit and wait as it slowly cycles through all eight possible formations. You must hit a button when your play is highlighted, and you can engage in all sorts of theatrics to "bluff" your opponent. The passing game is pathetic, and I hate how the runningback stops dead when he reaches the goal line, as if he's saving his energy for the extra point attempt. The playing field looks pretty good, except for that goofy eagle logo on the 50-yard line. The fat players are easy to follow, and although there is some flicker, it doesn't detract from the abysmal gameplay. Great Football's audio includes static-laden digitized crowd noise, and it sounds like they're chanting "Eddie! Eddie!" Short musical tunes play throughout the game, and while you might expect them to be annoying, they're actually somewhat endearing. The one-player mode is really odd. You only play on offense, trying overcome a computer opponent that's been spotted points. When it comes to pigskin action, it doesn't get much worse than Great Football. © Copyright 2005 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Great Golf
Grade: D
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2005/3/13

screenshotConsidering how "un-great" most sports games on the Master System are, Great Golf comes out looking fairly respectable. It's definitely on the slow side, but the basic mechanics mirror those found in more modern golf games like the PGA series for the Genesis. The main screen features both a bird's eye view of the hole and a larger view from behind your golfer. Unfortunately, it takes a few seconds for this "behind the golfer" view to be calculated and rendered on the screen, and over the course of a game those seconds can add up (especially with multiple players). Next you choose you club (sorry, no caddy), stance, and shot direction. Immediately after choosing the direction, a vertical power meters appears and quickly moves upward. You really need to be ready for it, especially if you intend to hit a soft shot. The golfer's swing animation is smooth, but it looks to me like he completely misses the ball. The ball flies off the tee anyway, and moves through the air in a slow, floaty manner. I found it far too easy to overswing and hit the ball out of bounds. An exceptional shot will reward you with a brief indecipherable voice sample that sounds like a zipper being pulled up and down very fast. All in all, I'm sure Great Golf was pretty impressive for its day, but it hasn't aged well, mainly due to its slow pacing. © Copyright 2005 The Video Game Critic.
1 to 4 players 


Great Ice Hockey
Grade: F-
Publisher: Sega (1986)
Reviewed: 2009/3/10

screenshotOf all the pitiful entries in Sega's "Great" line of sports games, this wretched atrocity permanently resides at the bottom. Great Ice Hockey is the plankton of the video game food chain. The main problem is how it inexplicably requires the piece-of-crapolla Sega Sports Pad - the single most unresponsive track-ball ever produced! The game begins like any 8-bit hockey title, presenting a bright white rink, some uptempo music, and small players not unlike those in Ice Hockey (NES, 1988). Immediately after face-off however, you immediately realize how worthless the controller is. You'll spin it like mad with your thumb, only to watch your player creep a half-inch. At first I thought my controller was broken! Before you can get off a pass off a swift CPU-controlled player snags the puck and speeds off toward your goal. The rink is spread over three screens, and when the screen flips from one to the next, you lose control of your player. Calling this unplayable would be an understatement! I can't imagine anyone persevering through an entire game, because a mere two minutes of this inflicts more suffering that any human should endure. From what I hear, these controllers were originally quite expensive, so you have to feel for the poor kid in 1986 who saved up his allowance all summer long just to purchase this steaming pile of dung. The saddest part is, this could have been a respectable game had Sega allowed it to be played with a normal controller. I suspect this was a case of greed on Sega's part, so in that case I'm glad Great Ice Hockey was a total bust. © Copyright 2009 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Great Soccer
Grade: F
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2004/4/18

screenshotHere's another pathetic entry to Sega's "Great" sport series. The cartoonish players wander around aimlessly, and they ALL have arrows over their heads. Shouldn't only the player you're controlling have the arrow? Oh, he has the outlined arrow - NOW it all makes sense (a little sarcasm there). As soon as your player touches the ball, he automatically kicks it a few feet ahead, and with so many other players crowded around, it's impossible to maintain any degree of control over the ball. You can't dribble and there are no headers, bicycle kicks, or any other standard moves. I recommend playing Great Soccer with one hand, so you can use the other to hold your nose. Playing this is a painful experience, as the ball tends to be kicked around endlessly in the same small area. At least the scrolling field doesn't look bad, and the ball does rotate nicely. High-pitched background music whines nonstop and will have you lunging for the volume control. I reviewed Great Soccer with longtime friend and Master System expert Eric V., and even he was astonished by how putrid this wretched piece of garbage is. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 player 


Hang On
Grade: B-
Publisher: Sega (1988)
Reviewed: 2001/2/11

screenshotHang On was a game built into the Sega Master System 2 consoles. It's a motorcycle game that looks and plays suspiciously like Pole Position, which came out many years prior. The steering is good; I felt in control even in traffic on curves. I did have a problem accidentally shifting gears when I was trying to turn however. The graphics aren't so hot. The other motorcycles all look the same. When your bike crashes, the explosion is ridiculously small. The road moves smoothly, and the other riders scale in and out pretty well, but there's not much to see. There are some tiny background graphics on the horizon, but there's not much on the side of the road except for some bushes and rocks. Each course has several stages which abruptly change the background and color. The first few stages are fairly plain, and the last two look just awful. There's a pathetic "city night" stage with miniature streetlights and buildings that never get closer, and the final stage is just like the first, except everything is orange! What the? There are three skills levels to keep the game challenging. Despite some unimpressive graphics, Hang On provides some decent racing action. © Copyright 2001 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 


Joe Montana Football
Grade: C+
Publisher: Sega (1991)
Reviewed: 2005/12/13


screenshotJoe Montana finally gave the Master System the respectable football game it so desperately needed. With its side-angle view, the game looks and plays much like the highly acclaimed Tecmo Bowl (NES, 1986). Selecting plays is easy enough, but the names are utterly bizarre. What the heck's a Subdural Hematoma? It sounds like a proctology procedure. As for the passing game, I like how you can easily select receivers, but the ball tends to float, so by the time it arrives defenders have already moved into position. Incomplete passes often bounce off the receivers' hands, which looks pretty cool. The running game is weak. You have to press a button just to hand the ball off, and you can forget about busting out a big gain. As for the kicking game, Joe Montana does a lousy job of indicating the ball's position in the air. During field goals, the shadow always passes through the posts, but the ball never appears to do so. Joe Montana won't win any awards for audio either, with its cringe-worthy crowd noise and tackles that sound more like flatulence. Did all of the players drive-thru Taco Bell on their way to the stadium? Finally, I really wish there was some type of half-time show. Joe Montana Football is no classic, but if you want to play football on your Sega Master System, this is clearly your best option. © Copyright 2005 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Kenseiden
Grade: D+
Publisher: Sega (1988)
Reviewed: 2010/3/2

screenshotHere's a colorful samurai title that lets you jump and slash your way through an ancient Japanese kingdom. The vibrant graphics feature sharp, high-resolution characters and rich scenery. An engaging soundtrack plays complex melodies with ominous undertones. I typically enjoy games like this, but Kenseiden goes out of its way to make you miserable. In the first stage you approach a temple at night while being accosted by giant beetles, rickety skeletons, swooping birds, and monkeys that hop all over the place. They're freaking me out man!! Upon arriving at the temple you'll contend with giant spiders, flying skulls, and mace-swinging guards. Your movements are stiff, which makes it hard to properly position yourself to slash these creeps. It's bad enough the way creatures materialize out of nowhere and knock you off ledges, but after defeating them, they regenerate! Cheap, mandatory hits are the order of the day. What's a young samurai to do? Run! Run like the wind! If you're lucky you'll find a "safe zone" where you can catch your breath. The first boss is a flaming wheel, and it's insanely hard to beat. Collectible scrolls augment your abilities, but there's no magic or special moves to give the game depth. I wish I could say the later stages are worth the effort to reach, but the nondescript caves and mountainsides are pretty unexciting. Kenseiden's visual and audio quality is beyond reproach, but its stiff controls and unforgiving gameplay will drive gamers over the edge. © Copyright 2010 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 12,200
1 player 


Kung Fu Kid
Grade: D-
Publisher: Sega (1987)
Reviewed: 2011/3/5

screenshotThis primitive side-scroller is extremely Japanese, which is a nice way of saying it's super weird. Its colorful graphics feature temples, bamboo forests, and a lot of traditional Japanese artwork (read: bright red). The soundtrack also has an appealing Japanese twang to it. As you move forward you're accosted by an endless parade of mindless henchmen, hopping vampires, and creepy dolls. The characters in this game are tiny and seem to constantly regenerate. In addition to unleashing flying kicks, our diminutive hero can toss playing cards at his enemies (I'm told it's a Japanese thing). The fighting can get tiresome, but there's a trick to this game. It didn't take me long to figure out that jumping forward is faster than walking. This led me to hop continuously through each stage in an attempt to avoid confrontations altogether. I had so much luck with this strategy that I actually felt a little guilty about using it! Just be sure to avoid that dripping water! As anyone familiar with classic games will tell you, water was deadly to the touch back in the 1980's! Equally dangerous are the hodge-podge of bosses who include a flying witch, a giant orange frog, and an acrobatic duo. Dying at the hands of a boss sends you all the way back to the beginning of the stage, and I don't like that. Kung Fu Kid is simplistic and doesn't make any sense. I'd like to call it "so bad it's good", but in this case it leans more towards "bad". © Copyright 2011 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 118,900
1 player 


Line of Fire (Europe)
Grade: B
Publisher: Sega (1991)
Reviewed: 2011/10/18

screenshotThis is an underrated vertical shooter that lets you blast through enemy territory in a jeep, boat, and helicopter. Line of Fire plays a lot like Rambo except you're constantly moving forward. Even the music sounds similar. Line of Fire's six relatively short stages take you through a variety of environments including a jungle, river valley, and a rocky gorge. You can rapidly fire a machine gun (forward only) to mow down enemy soldiers which look more like orcs from Lord of the Rings. You also have a limited supply of missiles you can guide through the air to take out helicopters and jet planes. Line of Fire is a little slow but very challenging and fun. Enemy mortars have a wide blast radius so even if you avoid a direct hit you'll need to keep your distance from the ensuing explosion. Stay alert for enemy trucks that sneak up from behind in the jungle stage. The explosion effects are tame but I love the way bridges collapse into the water in the river stage (a la River Raid). Line of Fire is a decent 2D shooter, but it really shines in 3D. Although the 3D feature is not advertised, it's activated if you hold in both buttons on the controller while turning on the system. Fortress walls rise up high, trees loom, and the canyons appear to be perilously deep. Since enemies attack from air and ground, the 3D effect makes it easier to tell which enemies you're "lined up" with. Certain projectiles seem to be on the wrong plane (they can always hit you), but in general the visual effect is fantastic. Line of Fire is worthwhile in 2D but it's a must-have title if you own the Sega 3D glasses. © Copyright 2011 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 502,150
1 player 


Lord of the Sword
Grade: C+
Publisher: Sega (1988)
Reviewed: 2010/3/2

screenshotHere's an appealing D&D-style adventure with a Lord of the Rings flavor. Three tasks have been set forth for your warrior to complete: Seek out the Tree of Mandrill, defeat the goblin of the Balala Valley, and destroy the Statue of Evil. Lord of the Sword is more sophisticated than your garden variety side-scroller. You explore a world with branching paths, talk to various characters, and carry up to three items at a time. The diverse scenery includes meadows, mountains, dark forests, bridges, castles, and townships. Each area is relatively small, and that's good because some backtracking is required. Monsters attack early and often in the form of floating eyeballs, leaping wolves, bobble-headed skeletons, and scampering scorpions. You're so unpopular that even fish leap out of water to bite you! Each enemy attacks with a distinctive pattern, and you'll quickly learn how to contend with each. I like how you can lure certain creatures (like scorpions) into pits where they become stuck. You can slash with your sword and shoot an unlimited supply of arrows with your bow. The bow is slow to load and shoot, but it comes in handy against those spore-flinging Straw Flies. The gameplay is slow and methodical, and it's easy to get lost in the maze of pathways. Lord of the Sword's graphics are better than average, and your character is rendered with impressive detail. The monsters look great, and I especially love those hovering red demons with the glowing eyes. The looping soundtrack is okay, but bound to get on your nerves after a while. The game offers ten continues. Lord of the Sword requires a bit of patience, but those who can deal with its slow, deliberate pace will be rewarded. © Copyright 2010 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 59,000
1 player 



Select new range: [Previous] [A-E] F-L [M-R] [S-Z] [Next]

Screen shots courtesy of Video Game Museum, GameSpot

Return to Sega Master System index

Return to Main Page


© Copyright 1999-2014 The Video Game Critic. The reviews presented on this site are intellectual property and are copyrighted. Any reproduction without the expressed written consent of the author is strictly prohibited. Anyone reproducing the site's copyrighted material improperly can be prosecuted in a court of law. Please report any instances of infringement to the site administrator.