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Title Range: D-E

Dance Dance Revolution
Grade: B-
Publisher: Konami (2001)
Reviewed: 2002/1/29
Rating: Everyone

screenshotDespite being a heterosexual male, I tend to enjoy music and dancing games. I think Bust a Groove (PS) and Samba De Amigo (DC) are two of the best party games of all time, and Dance Dance Revolution is cast from the same mold. DDR's gameplay involves pressing buttons in rhythm with the music, but in this case the buttons are laid out on a "dance mat" (included with the game). The game contains literally dozens of songs, but you're not likely to recognize any of them. Heck, I couldn't even tell the song titles from the artist names! As far as the quality of the music goes, it's a mixed bag. Most of these up-tempo tunes are pretty good, but a few are almost unbearable. Using the dance mat requires coordination and practice. Expect to get a pretty good workout! You can purchase better mats, but the one included is hard to stay situated on, as it tends to slide around. And don't expect to learn how to dance playing this game, because you'll be looking pretty ridiculous playing this. The game is definitely fun, but the difficulty is a bit harsh for beginners. Playing with the normal controller is much easier, but that defeats the purpose of the game, doesn't it? © Copyright 2002 The Video Game Critic.

1 or 2 players 


Darkstalkers
Grade: C+
Publisher: Capcom (1996)
Reviewed: 2001/6/8
Rating: Teen (violence and blood)

screenshotIf there was ever a fighting game that valued style over substance, it's Darkstalkers. Basically it's Street Fighter II with monsters, including a vampire, a werewolf, a mummy, and a sexy cat-woman. Darkstalkers is loaded with funny animations, gorgeous backgrounds, over-the-top moves, and scantily clad women. Each of the ten characters has their own arsenal of attacks and super moves, and the ladies are quite easy on the eyes. What more could you ask for? Well, better gameplay, for one thing. Darkstalkers is rather shallow, and the shape-shifting moves are hard to follow and encourage button mashing. The action gets particularly confusing with faster characters like the hyperactive werewolf. The load times are a bit extreme, and the title sequence is idiotic. Still, if 2D fighters are your thing, Darkstalkers should keep you entertained for a while. It's only an average fighter, but at least there's plenty of eye candy. © Copyright 2001 The Video Game Critic.

1 or 2 players 


Darkstalkers 3
Grade: B+
Publisher: Capcom (1998)
Reviewed: 1999/7/15
Rating: Teen (violence)

screenshotIn case you're wondering what happened to Darkstalkers 2, that game was called Night Warriors and only released for the Sega Saturn. Compared to the original game, Darkstalkers 3 is a noticeable improvement. There a many more characters, and they tend to be larger and better animated. At its core it still plays like Street Fighter 2, but its offbeat humor and macabre style give it a distinctive flavor. The fun, sometimes nightmarish backgrounds are highly detailed and a feast for the eyes. It's not the deepest fighter in the world, but fans of the series should flip over Darkstalkers 3. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.

1 or 2 players 


Dead In The Water
Grade: F
Publisher: ASC (1998)
Reviewed: 2000/8/10
Rating: Everyone

screenshotIt's difficult to remember the last time I enjoyed a game less than Dead In The Water. The premise of the game - Twisted Metal with boats - certainly has potential. The boats themselves are imaginative and detailed, and you can even soup them up with the money you win from races. Unfortunately, the sea resembles a huge vat of Jello and the gameplay is just hopeless. Unresponsive controls and poor track design make navigation difficult to say the least. The weapons don't do nearly enough damage, so the battles just go on forever. That sissy machine gun isn't even worth messing with, and neither is this game. Despite a boatload of options and features, Dead In The Water is a disaster of titanic proportions. © Copyright 2000 The Video Game Critic.

1 or 2 players 


Dead or Alive
Grade: B+
Publisher: Tecmo (1998)
Reviewed: 2004/1/2
Rating: Suggestive Themes

screenshotDead or Alive has become a well-respected fighting game franchise, but its debut was somewhat of a joke. All anyone could talk about, it seems, is the game's over-the-top simulation of bouncing breasts. Dead Or Alive is probably the best looking fighter on the Playstation, with visuals that even exceed the Tekken games. The characters feature remarkably smooth, well-rounded bodies, and Kasumi looks unbelievably hot for a Playstation character. It's a shame that of the eight fighters, only three are female, because the males seem boring by comparison! Graphics notwithstanding, Dead or Alive one is of the better fighters available for the system. Each character has literally dozens of moves (listed in the manual), and the silky-smooth animations make the bouts entertaining to watch. The gameplay is solid but not quite as deep as Tekken 3. I like how you can stomp a fighter who's on the ground, but it's a shame there's no side-step move. Dead or Alive rewards aggressive behavior, so don't be shy about pounding the buttons. The breathtaking background graphics feature photorealistic city skylights, tropical islands, and industrial areas at sunset. The music is equally good, and it varies greatly from stage to stage. Playing modes include training, team battle, survival, time attack, versus, and tournament, but my favorite is the "Kumite Mode", which pits you against a series of computer opponents. Since the minimum number of battles in Kumite mode is 30, you may want to set the match point to "one round" before undertaking this. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.

1 or 2 players 


Deathtrap Dungeon
Grade: D+
Publisher: Eidos (1998)
Reviewed: 2012/7/8
Rating: Mature 17+ (animated blood and gore, animated violence)

screenshotThis medieval adventure was released hot on the heels of Tomb Raider, when Eidos was the hottest developer around. All things considered, Deathtrap Dungeon was a disappointment. It's certainly less memorable than its racy magazine ad featuring a mega-hot dominatrix with a whip. The game's CGI introduction is entertaining enough, depicting a goofy knight stumbling his way through a dungeon while contending with dart-traps, skeletons, a pig strapped with dynamite, and a rampaging T-Rex shamelessly recycled from Tomb Raider. You select from two playable characters including a muscular dude and a Shirley Manson look-alike in a skimpy leather outfit. Tough choice, right? Sadly, the technology for rendering female form wasn't very far along, so the chicks in this game look more angular than sexy. As its name would imply, the game features a series of dungeons loaded with floating platforms, elevators, levers, traps, and fiends. You'll battle orcs, giant spiders, bulldozers-of-death, and annoying gnomes that giggle as they scamper around. The first time I played Deathtrap Dungeon I hated it because I couldn't make any progress. Later I discovered that when standing on a platform, you simply press the square button to put it in motion! That makes absolutely no sense but it makes the game a heck of a lot easier. It's a shame the analog controller had not been introduced before this game, because these controls are terribly clunky. Your character turns slowly, making it hard to face approaching foes. You can execute several different sword attacks, but the swing controls are unresponsive. Fortunately one hit is usually enough to slice your attacker into meaty chunks. The lack of any camera control makes it difficult to gauge jumps, and the health meter and inventory system are poorly designed. Hints are provided in the form of arrows on the wall (really?) and cheesy inscriptions like "you can climb here" (c'mon now!). The audio may be the strongest aspect of the game. Sound effects like pounding drums and rumbling stone blocks pack plenty of bass, and the ominous musical score is also effective. Despite its shortcomings, Deathtrap Dungeon has its moments. When you're stuck in a room trying to lure hissing snake women into traps, it's exciting. The short stages are packed with secrets, and it's always interesting to see what the next area has in store. There are plenty of save points, but not nearly enough health icons. Deathtrap Dungeon can be an interesting dungeon romp, but only if you set your expectations low enough. © Copyright 2012 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Destruction Derby
Grade: C
Publisher: Psygnosis (1995)
Reviewed: 2010/5/25
Rating: Kids to Adults

screenshotLet's say that a certain critic, who will go unnamed, overrates a game by a country mile. Many years later the aforementioned critic realizes his blunder and dramatically revises his grade. Does that make me - I mean him - a bad person? I guess this is the point when I bow down and beg my readers for forgiveness. Destruction Derby has what it takes under the hood but can't quite reach the finish line. The highlight of the game is its devastating collisions, complete with flying shards and smoke. There's even some modest damage modeling. Two types of contests are available: stockcar racing and smash-up derby. Races are held within narrow, confined tracks, and there's not much to see. The boxy cars all move in the same direction so things don't get interesting until you reach an intersection. Now we're talking! I'm not sure what's more fun - narrowly slicing through traffic or slamming into the side of a speeding car. Plowing into a large traffic jam is satisfying too. Just don't get spun around because it's easy to become disoriented and hard to get back on track. A diagram in the lower corner indicates the status of your car, and it's pretty exciting as you enter those final few laps on your last legs. Simply completing a race is tough, especially since they can be up to 20 laps long! Sometimes your damaged car will begin veering to one side, and that really sucks. If the races bore you, give the smash-up-derbies a try. These take place in a wide-open, circular arena, and begin with all 19 cars (!) barreling towards the center. If you don't think that's fun, well, sorry - I can't help you man. The frame-rate slows on occasion, but that just gives you more time to take in the mayhem. Points are earned for spinning other cars around, but not for straight-on collisions (boo!). Destruction Derby is tailor-made for multi-player action, but would you believe there's no split-screen support? The link cable is supported, but to my knowledge not a single person in the whole wide world ever bought one of those freakin' things. The soundtrack is an uneven mix of cool techno tunes and annoying wacky ditties. Destruction Derby shows its age but at the very least it still delivers a healthy dose of mindless destruction. © Copyright 2010 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Destruction Derby 2
Grade: D
Publisher: Psygnosis (1996)
Reviewed: 2004/7/4
Rating: Everyone

screenshotThe first Destruction Derby was fun, but this one is a piece of [expletive]. In theory, Destruction Derby 2 (DD2) has a lot going for it, with improved graphics, faster gameplay, and more interesting tracks. Unlike the first game, cars can flip over and get knocked high into the air, resulting in more spectacular wrecks. But DD2's gameplay positively stinks! The circular smash-up-derby arena from the previous game is back, but this time it's virtually unplayable. As soon as your car gets hit, it goes sailing into the air. Then you find yourself getting gangbanged against a side wall as cars relentlessly plow into you. You can never seem to regain control, and it feels frustrating and pointless. The racing modes are better, but not great. The tracks are wider this time around, minimizing the congestion and pileups that made the first game such a hoot. Although there are some exciting jumps, some ramps are crooked, causing your car to inconveniently flip over. Your vehicle handles poorly, and each time your car bangs into something, you end up facing the wrong direction. Consequently, a tedious three-point turn is required to get back on track. There's a pit stop available, but just like so many other racing games, it's not very useful. Perhaps the most shocking aspect of DD2 is that it contains no two-player options at all! The original Destruction Derby is decent, but steer clear of this lackluster sequel. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Destruction Derby Raw
Grade: C+
Publisher: Psygnosis (2000)
Reviewed: 2004/7/4
Rating: Everyone

screenshotDespite addressing most of the issues that plagued the ill-conceived Destruction Derby 2, Raw is still not very exciting. The reason is simple - the collisions are lame! The crashes in the original Destruction Derby were punctuated by flying debris, billowing smoke, and ear-crunching sound effects. In Destruction Derby Raw, you basically just bounce off the other cars, which is not satisfying at all. It's a shame, because otherwise this is an impressive effort. The analog steering has a nice loose feel and the cars handle like a dream. The dirt tracks have a gritty, industrial look and feature some interesting layouts. Unfortunately, they also tend to be pretty wide and long, so even though you're racing against 19 other cars, it's possible to go a whole lap or two without even seeing anybody else! In addition, you rarely witness any major wrecks or pile-ups. As a one-player racing game, Destruction Derby Raw is respectable, but the split-screen action is a bore. DDR's graphics are good, and its grinding rock music isn't bad either. It's a decent racer, but it would benefit from more "Destruction" and less "Derby". © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.

1 to 4 players 


Diablo
Grade: B
Publisher: Electronic Arts (1998)
Reviewed: 2001/1/13
Rating: Mature (violence, blood, gore)

screenshotThis is a very nice adaptation of the popular PC action/adventure. Viewing the action from a tilted overhead perspective, Diablo takes you through sixteen dungeon levels teeming with goblins, spiders, and demons. Naturally there's an obligatory village area where you can gather information at the pub and purchase items. Diablo starts off as a slash-fest, but once you acquire the ability to cast spells, there's a lot more strategy. You'll outfit your warrior from head to toe, and there's an amazing variety of armor, weapons, scrolls and items. We all know the PC game is great, but how does this Playstation version compare? Well, the dark dungeon graphics are not nearly as detailed and small creatures are difficult to discern. The control scheme takes some getting used to, and you're likely to waste a few spells before you get comfortable with the button combinations. The audio is fantastic, with creepy sound effects and intense background music. The biggest problem with the game is its excruciating load times between levels and during game saves. PC gamers will find this Diablo second rate, but newcomers will find this Playstation edition engrossing enough, and should also check out the exclusive two-player mode. © Copyright 2001 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Die Hard Trilogy
Grade: A
Publisher: Fox (1996)
Reviewed: 1999/7/15
Rating: Mature (blood and violence)

screenshotDie Hard Trilogy is an incredible value when you consider it consists of three completely separate games, including a third-person shooter, a light-gun shooter, and a driving game. Each of them are of exceptional quality, featuring top-notch graphics and exceptional control. The light-gun shooter (based on Die Hard 2) is the best of the bunch, boasting a level of realism and gore unsurpassed for a 1996 title. Blowing away terrorists in an airport has never been so much fun! In the third-person shooter you controlling a little Bruce Willis trying to infiltrate an office building, and it's hard as hell. The driving game involves finding a time bomb in a city and features Sam Jackson's frantic yelling. No question about it, Die Hard Trilogy is one very impressive package. Note: Namco's Guncon controller is not supported in this game. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Die Hard Trilogy 2
Grade: B+
Publisher: Fox (1998)
Reviewed: 2000/12/10
Rating: Mature (blood, gore, violence)

screenshotThe first Die Hard Trilogy game was a huge hit, released when the Playstation system was still fairly new. This game on the other hand didn't much media attention. Like the first Trilogy, this sequel features a third-person shooter, a light-gun shooter, and a car chase game. The "arcade mode" lets you dive right into any one, and the "movie mode" alternates between all three games, tying them together with full-motion-video cut-scenes. The third-person shooter is outstanding, with large characters and interesting stage locations. An auto-aiming feature makes it a pleasure to mow down the bad guys, and believe me, there's a lot of blood-letting to be had! The light-gun game is also impressive, and it supports Namco's Guncon - the most accurate gun you can get for the Playstation. You'll need it, because many targets are quite small, including knives being tossed your way (a la Lethal Enforcers). In the driving game you ram over cars to destroy them, but it's probably the weakest of the three. You'll race through the country as well as downtown, but the steering is problematic. Even with the analog control, your turn radius is too wide, making it difficult to turn around. Die Hard Trilogy 2 does feel a bit like a rehash, but it still delivers a lot of bang for the buck. © Copyright 2000 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Dino Crisis 2
Grade: A-
Publisher: Capcom (2000)
Reviewed: 2002/1/29
Rating: Mature (blood, gore, violence)

screenshotThe first Dino Crisis was basically Resident Evil with dinosaurs, and much of its gameplay consisted of slow puzzle-solving exercises. This terrific sequel takes just the opposite approach however. In Dino Crisis 2, the dinosaurs just keep coming, turning this into an arcade shooter with endless Jurassic Park-inspired scenes. Much of the time you're literally running for your life! The controls have been improved so you can now run-and-gun, and a clever aiming system makes it easy to pick off raptors that seem to come out of the woodwork. The creatures look remarkably lifelike. The raptors are ruthless, but the T-Rex is so slow and dumb you can run circles around him! Killing dinosaurs earns you points used toward the purchase of weapons, items, and tools. The graphics are Resident Evil-quality, which is to say, excellent. A ridiculous storyline nearly spoils the game, but the frantic action makes that easy to overlook. Once I began playing Dino Crisis 2, it was difficult to stop! This is one of the most exciting adventures you'll have on your Playstation. © Copyright 2002 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Disney's Hercules
Grade: A-
Publisher: Disney (1997)
Reviewed: 2000/6/20
Rating: Everyone

screenshotJust like the classic Disney games on the 16-bit systems, Hercules combines high quality cartoon graphics with simple platform action. All the characters from the movie are here, and they are exceptionally well animated. The colorful, multi-tiered backgrounds are brightly detailed and fun to look at. Although most of the action is 2D, there are some 3D stages, including the amazing "Cyclops Attack" level where you run down the street of a crumbing city as a giant cyclops looms in the distance. Hercules generally follows the storyline of the movie, and even contains film clips between levels. The comical voice samples and background music are lifted straight from the film, and there's even a music video included! Most importantly, Hercules is fun to play, with plenty of variety, secret areas, bosses, and power-ups. Whether you enjoyed the film or not, this is a very entertaining title that will appeal to gamers of all ages. © Copyright 2000 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Doom
Grade: A-
Publisher: Midway (1995)
Reviewed: 2012/1/2
Rating: Mature

screenshotBoasting over 50 hellish stages, this is a superb translation of the classic PC title. Doom is first-person shooting at its purest. It's satisfying to shoot demons in the face with a double-barreled shotgun as you navigate multi-tiered fortresses. The antiquated graphics look chunky but the frame-rate keeps pace even when you're being ambushed by a gang of fireball-throwing imps. Doom conveys a harrowing atmosphere that often borders on terrifying. Its ominous soundtrack makes you wary of impending... uh... doom, and the resonating sound effects are alarming. Colored lighting is used to good effect. Flamable barrels are the equivalent of water coolers in hell, so If you spot several possessed soldiers congregating around one, blast it to splatter their guts all over the floor. Doom is packed with memorable sights and sounds, from an imp spitting up blood, to the digitized mountain backdrops, to a demon snorting his final breath. As an early PS1 title, the analog controls are not supported, so you'll need to use the D-pad. I'd recommend reconfiguring the controls to use X to shoot instead of triangle. The lack of a jump button is actually refreshing considering jumping always sucks in an FPS. Most stages are relatively short but numerous secret areas add replay value. It's nice how text displays on the screen alerting you to what item you've picked up. If I have one complaint, it's the inability to save your progress to memory card (the game provides a password instead). Two-player modes are available, but only via the link cable which nobody owns. With its compact stage designs, clever puzzles, and frequent surprises, Doom is more than the sum of its parts. There are plenty of versions of this game available for various consoles, but this is the one you really want. © Copyright 2012 The Video Game Critic.
Save mechanism: Password
1 or 2 players 


Driver
Grade: A-
Publisher: GT Interactive (1999)
Reviewed: 1999/8/23
Rating: Teen (mild language

screenshotDriver places you in the role of a criminal on a series of exciting missions that usually send you racing through the streets while eluding cops who are trying to run you off the road. Driver's graphics are superb and its frame rate is smooth, giving the game the look and feel of a Starsky and Hutch car chase! It's quite a rush to bounce over curbs and side-swipe cars in a desperate attempt to flee from the cops. This was one of the first games to let you drive freely through a city with traffic and pedestrians. The heart of the game is the mission-based story mode, which features a number of 1970's trademarks including afros and jive talking. Most gamers however will prefer the "survival mode", where you see how long you can last against a squad of kamikaze police cars. It's absolute chaos, and you can't help but laugh at the carnage that ensues. None of my friends could even last for more than a minute! Following each try you can view an instant replay, and these are hilarious. The game's four locations include Miami, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York. Although the cities do contain familiar landmarks, they are not laid out like the real places. The scenery is detailed and attractive, but Driver suffers from a terrible case of "draw-in", where entire buildings suddenly appear in front of you as you approach. There's also some slowdown when things get hectic, but that should be expected considering the nature of the game. There are some technical issues, but they should not chase you away from this thrill-a-minute title. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 


ESPN Extreme Games
Grade: B+
Publisher: Sony (1995)
Reviewed: 2004/1/1

screenshotThis oldie but goodie was first released as ESPN Extreme Games but later renamed "1 Extreme". See that review for details. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.



Echo Night
Grade: B-
Publisher: Agetec (1999)
Reviewed: 2013/11/4
Rating: Teen (animated blood, mild language)

screenshotI enjoy survival horror but this obscure title had slipped under my radar until a reader brought it to my attention. Echo Night is a slow-moving but intelligently designed adventure in which you play a character investigating the disappearance of his father. Most of the action takes place on an ominous ship at sea, where you'll communicate with ghosts, scour for clues, and solve puzzles to put restless souls at peace. The rooms and hallways tends to be very dark, so you'll always want to look for a light switch (which keep evil ghosts at bay). Echo Night generates a lot of suspense with its deliberate pacing and foreboding atmosphere. The scenery looks pretty remarkable thanks to its rich textures and excellent lighting effects. The characters tend to be stiff with distorted faces, but this makes them all the more creepy. Most of the action involves exploration and manipulating items to solve puzzles. You play from a first-person perspective, which can be disconcerting in close quarters, conveying a sense of claustrophobia. The controls are digital only and they feel stiff. The button configuration takes some getting used to, as the left shoulder buttons look up and down and the right ones are used to strafe. Echo Night's narrative is a little hard to follow. Some of the awkward dialogue and bizarre cut-scenes don't make much sense, but that might be a translation problem. Flashback scenes take you to brighter, less scary locations which attempt to fill in holes in the story. Is Echo Night scary? Yes! I freaked out when I saw that floating girl in the hallway, and whenever I heard her giggle my blood ran cold. The vibration feedback and stereo effects will also give you a jolt. Slow-building but effective, Echo Night is a cinematic horror title that will keep you on the edge of your seat. © Copyright 2013 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Einhander
Grade: B-
Publisher: Squaresoft (1998)
Reviewed: 1999/7/15
Rating: Everyone

screenshotRendered in graphically stunning 3D, Einhander ushered side-scrolling shooters into a new age. Its layered backdrops, swinging camera angles, huge adversaries, and realistic explosions make Einhander a feast for the eyes. There are several weapons available which you can aim on the fly. Einhander is fun, but you must always begin on stage one, and reaching the later stages is difficult and time-consuming. Also, since your ship is large and the bosses are huge, there's rarely enough room on the screen to maneuver around. It might not be a classic, but many fans of the shooting genre consider this an old favorite. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.

1 player 


Elemental Gearbolt
Grade: B
Publisher: Working Designs (1997)
Reviewed: 1999/7/15
Rating: Teen

screenshotThis arcade-style light-gun shooter offers a moving point-of-view, in contrast to most light-gun games where you take aim from a stationary position. It's both refreshing and fun. Elemental Gearbolt's storyline resembles an RPG, and the attractive 3D graphics are rendered in an anime style. The animation is smooth and exhilirating scenes make you feel as if you're moving at high speeds. The scenery is spectacular at times, and a two-players cooperative modei is a nice bonus. As icing on the cake, Elemental Gearbolt is also compatible with Namco's Guncon controller. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.

1 or 2 players 



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