VGC Mobile
system main

Title Range: T

T2: The Arcade Game
Grade: D
Publisher: LJN (1993)
Reviewed: 2012/10/23

screenshotThis shooter was designed for use with the bazooka-shaped Super Scope light gun. I was disappointed with the Genesis edition of T2: The Arcade Game, and hoped this SNES edition would improve upon it. It's actually a step down. The digitized images look sharper than the Genesis, but the colors appear washed out. In stage one you unleash hell on a parade of terminators on a red, post-apocalyptic battlefield. The rapid-fire shooting is fun for a while, and helpful "smart bombs" obliterate everything on the screen. Human reinforcements tend to get in the way, screaming "yelp!" when you accidentally shoot them. The flying ships don't catch on fire when you shoot them, but instead just shatter in a very unconvincing fashion. The end-of-stage tank boss is extremely difficult because he sprays missiles all over the screen. The human hideout stage features one distinctive sound effect (a dog barking) but its visuals are lame. Arnold doesn't look like himself, leading me to believe a less-beefy, digitized imposter was used in his place. The protect-the-truck stage is unintentionally funny as terminators run like chickens alongside the speeding vehicle. Some stages feature "golden" endoskeletons that look like a bunch of C3POs. What the hell is that all about? The Super Scope is slightly more accurate than the Genesis Menacer, but its cursor only appears when you pull the trigger. As on the Genesis, hitting targets near the left side of the screen is a problem. The SNES mouse is supported, but who wants to use a mouse for an arcade game? A normal controller works okay but feels inexact. The game supports coop action which definitely makes it more playable. T2 on the SNES is a serious underachiever, and I actually prefer the Genesis edition. © Copyright 2012 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 1,297,000
1 or 2 players 


Tecmo Super Bowl
Grade: B
Publisher: Tecmo (1993)
Reviewed: 2004/8/26

screenshotTecmo Super Bowl for the SNES plays like the original NES version, only with crisper graphics and clearer sound effects. But although the game was an institution on the NES, it barely made a splash on the SNES. To gamers who cut their teeth on Madden, Tecmo may look a bit outdated. The field is viewed from the side in 30-yard chunks. The players are small but nicely animated, making it easy to see plays unfold. The playbooks and controls are minimal compared to Madden, but Tecmo has an arcade sensibility that Madden lacks. You can knock down players on offense or defense by tapping the A button, allowing running backs to shake off would-be tacklers. On passing plays, cycling through receivers is fun, but you can't see those who run deep routes. One problem with defense is that once you select a player you can't change him after the play begins. Tecmo Super Bowl features cool cut-scenes that embellish kicks and diving catches, but what's the deal with that lame clown in the half time show? Where are the cheerleaders? Despite its flaws, Tecmo football is always a good time, and this is probably the definitive version of the classic game. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.
1-2 players 


Tecmo Super NBA Basketball
Grade: D+
Publisher: Tecmo (1993)
Reviewed: 2004/8/26

screenshotThis basketball game has a great look, especially compared to the chunky early EA basketball games like Bulls Vs. Blazers (SNES, Genesis). Tecmo Basketball's court and players are well defined, and its smooth (but slow) animation features plenty of nifty slam dunks. Unfortunately, the gameplay is marred by numerous flaws that drag down the fun factor. Your view of the action is from the side, but the camerawork is awful. When you bring the ball up the court, you can't even see whom you're passing to! In general, it's hard to tell whom you're controlling. The block button is the same as the shoot button (bad idea!), resulting in balls being inadvertently flung the length of the court! There's no "turbo" function, making it awfully hard to penetrate to the hoop. Referees call fouls even on minimal contact, and you can't adjust the foul frequency. Cut-scenes often flash during three-point shots or blocks, but these tend to be disorienting, interrupting the flow of the game. On a positive note, Tecmo Basketball provides a sweet half-time show with cheerleaders, and tracks player stats thanks to a battery backup. It's not a total loss, but basketball games have come a long way, and Tecmo Super NBA Basketball offers little reason to go back. © Copyright 2004 The Video Game Critic.
1-2 players 


Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time
Grade: B+
Publisher: Nintendo (1992)
Reviewed: 1999/10/11

screenshotWow - talk about eye candy - this game looks fantastic! In this fourth game of the series, one or two players select from the four Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in this side-scrolling brawler. Its sharp graphics resemble a cartoon, with vibrant colors and smooth animation. The upbeat music is excellent and the control is remarkably tight. Only two buttons are used, but there's still a nice variety of moves. My favorite allows you to throw the enemy into the screen (towards the player!). It's a cool scaling effect, and it's actually necessary to defeat one of the bosses. Enemies tend to be generic ninjas dressed in different colored outfits, but the bosses are quite imaginative and well-armed with special attacks. The diverse stages locales include city streets, a sewer, the prehistoric past, and a pirate ship, to name a few. The action is fast and never lets up, but it does have a few faults. Although you can choose between four characters, there's not an appreciable difference between them. Also, battling the same ninjas over and over can get monotonous. All in all, this is a solid arcade fighter, but Turtles in Time is anything but deep. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Tetris 2
Grade: A-
Publisher: Nintendo (1994)
Reviewed: 1999/11/1

screenshotHow do you top what is arguably the most popular video game of all time? It's not easy, but Nintendo comes close with Tetris 2. The game looks similar to Tetris, but its gameplay is much different. Instead of completing rows, you must instead destroy "flash blocks" scattered around the board. Blocks are destroyed by lining up three or more of the same color. As they explode, chain reactions can occur, which can be extremely satisfying. You really have to play the game to appreciate how brilliant it is. While simple in concept, Tetris 2 requires both skill and strategy. Modes include a one-player puzzle mode and an incredibly addictive head-to-head mode. A wealth of options allows you to customize the difficulty, speed, round, and music. If Tetris 2 has a weakness, it lies in the graphics. Nintendo couldn't have been expected to do much with the blocks, but the backgrounds are painfully simple and dull. The music is not bad, but can get annoying after playing for a few hours straight (which is not uncommon). Still, these are minor quibbles considering the outstanding gameplay. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.
Save mechanism: Password
1 or 2 players 


Tetris Attack
Grade: A-
Publisher: Nintendo (1996)
Reviewed: 1999/12/21

screenshotIn case you haven't noticed, Nintendo is big on Tetris. They've released many variations of the game, so I put this cartridge in thinking the cow had run dry. As it turns out, I was wrong. This is yet another excellent Tetris-inspired puzzle game which will keep you riveted for hours on end! This time, you are presented with a mountain of blocks which rise as new rows bubble up from underneath. The only move you can make it to swap blocks that are side-to-side. Line up three or more of the same color and they explode. In sounds simple but the possibilities are endless. In the one player game, your goal is to keep the pile below a certain level, and in the two-player game you compete for score. Tetris Attack is easy to play but tough to master - a sure sign of a great game. © Copyright 1999 The Video Game Critic.
Save mechanism: Password
1 or 2 players 


Tetris and Dr. Mario
Grade: A-
Publisher: Nintendo (1994)
Reviewed: 2000/1/10

screenshotHow many versions of Tetris can Nintendo release?? For the love of God man!! That Russian guy must be a billionaire by now! I guess I really can't blame Nintendo however, since these puzzle games are easy to program, fun to play, and people just can't get enough of them. This cartridge offers two games, including a nice version of the original Tetris, with all the playing modes and settings you would ever want. The second game called Dr. Mario. What's the difference between Dr. Mario and Tetris 2?? Well, it's a subtle distinction. The main difference as I can tell is that the falling pieces in Dr. Mario are two-part "capsules" instead of four-part shapes. I definitely like the music and the sound of pills clicking against each other. There's also a mixed game that allows two players alternate between Tetris and Dr. Mario. No question about it - this cartridge combo offers more than enough puzzle fun to go around. © Copyright 2000 The Video Game Critic.
1 or 2 players 


Thunder Spirits
Grade: A-
Publisher: Seika (1991)
Reviewed: 2001/11/24

screenshotGenesis fans will instantly recognize this as a port of the classic shooter Thunder Force 3 (Genesis, 1990). Now SNES players can see what all the fuss is about! Imaginative graphics, catchy music, awesome weapons, and addictive gameplay distinguish this insanely fun side-scroller. Each stage is set on a planet with its own distinctive environment, usually suited for a specific weapon. I love being about use the shoulder buttons to toggle my weapon and adjust my speed. My only problem I have with Thunder Spirits is not being able to select the order in which I play the stages. It's not a show-stopper, but it gives the Genesis version a slight edge. Hint: Go into the "hidden" (Start + Select) option menu to turn on rapid-fire. Pretty sweet! © Copyright 2001 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 


Timecop
Grade: D+
Publisher: JVC (1995)
Reviewed: 2011/7/23

screenshotMost critics would be quick to kick a shoddy, movie-based game like Timecop to the curb. However, I happen to be a huge Jean-Claude Van Damme (JCVD) fan! Ever since my buddy Eric introduced me to Bloodsport (on VHS tape), I was hooked on those high-flying roundhouse kicks! Positively bad-ass! Did I mention Van Damme can dodge bullets by doing a split!? As psyched as I was about this game, the packaging was a bit of a turnoff. Instead of a movie photo it has a comic-book style illustration, conveying the impression of a generic shooter with the Timecop license grafted on top of it. The game's introduction further perpetrates a fraud, describing a villain and plotline that have nothing to do with the film. With my expectations downtrodden, you can imagine my surprise when I found myself controlling a digitized version of JCVD himself! I am utterly fascinated by the fact that this game uses live characters and digitized scenery. It's a concept rarely seen outside of the original Mortal Kombat games. Maybe there's a reason for that. The armed guards and gang members look great, but their movements look idiotic! They march around like they were robots or tin soldiers or something. The controls are difficult to grasp and hardly what I'd call "crisp". It takes a second for our hero to execute a roundhouse kick, and by then he's usually been punched or shot. The jump kick is effective, but since you jump across the entire screen, it's hard to target an enemy. Your sweep kick is the safest option, as many enemies seem incapable of hitting anything below waist level. You're also equipped with a gun but ammo is hard to come by. Timecop packs all the platform game cliches like leaky steam pipes, collapsing ledges, and floating platforms. The stages include a lab facility, New York City circa 1929, and an ugly futuristic L.A. The Washington DC stage is set in 2005, which means it was the future when the game was released but since has become the past. Yes, I know - I just blew your mind! The weirdest part of the game is an inexplicable underwater submarine shooting stage (apparently set under the San Andreas Fault). Timecop reeks of badness, but it frequently veers into "so bad it's good territory". Once you grasp its quirks, it's fun to play for score. I love how the edgy synthesized soundtrack is peppered with goofy electronic samples. Is this a 16-bit platformer, or a parody of 16-bit platformers? Many regard it as garbage, but Timecop is a fascinating relic that trascends time and space. JCVD fans should definitely bump up the grade by a letter. © Copyright 2011 The Video Game Critic.
Our high score: 21,480
1 player 


True Lies
Grade: A-
Publisher: LJN (1994)
Reviewed: 2001/6/6

screenshotNot only is True Lies one hell of a game, but it does a fine job of staying faithful to the movie. The stages follow the storyline, and each is preceded with a digitized still image from the film. True Lies is basically an overhead scroller with endless shootouts in locations like a chateau, mall, park, and refinery. Fine-tuned controls include a diving roll and a strafing move that's incredibly useful. Harry is armed with uzis, flame-throwers, shotguns, and grenades. There's no shortage of ammo, and I like how enemies splatter with blood and fall to the ground when shot. Just be careful not to shoot three civilians, because then you're forced to restart the level. The background music is good, and the sound effects are remarkable. For example, when on the docks, you not only hear the water, but you can even hear the rats scurrying! Harry's partner (Tom Arnold) posts advice on the bottom of the screen and a password saves your progress. True Lies shows a lot of originality, and really captures the spirit of a great action film. © Copyright 2001 The Video Game Critic.
1 player 



Select new range: [Previous] [A-B] [C-E] [F-G] [H-L] [M] [N-R] [Sa-Sm] [Sn-Sz] T [U-Z] [Next]

Screen shots courtesy of Video Game Museum, Console Classix, Moby Games, Games Database

Return to Super Nintendo index

Return to Main Page


© Copyright 1999-2014 The Video Game Critic. The reviews presented on this site are intellectual property and are copyrighted. Any reproduction without the expressed written consent of the author is strictly prohibited. Anyone reproducing the site's copyrighted material improperly can be prosecuted in a court of law. Please report any instances of infringement to the site administrator.