Favorite Albums of the 90s

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rockofhysteria
Posts: 111
Joined: October 27th, 2016, 7:49 pm

Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby rockofhysteria » July 29th, 2018, 10:50 pm

Tall Stories-Tall Stories
Talisman-Talisman
Bon Jovi-Keep The Faith
Bon Jovi-These Days
Foreigner-Unusual Heat
Journey-Trial By Fire
Great White-Hooked
Def Leppard-Adrenalize,Retro Active-Slang-Euphoria
Styx-Edge of the Century
Tyketto-Shine
Van Halen-Balance
Travis Tritt-It's All About To Change,TROUBLE,Ten Feet Tall and Bulletproof
Aaron Tippin-Read Between The Lines,Call of the Wild
Heart-Brigage
Jon Bon Jovi-Blaze of Glory
Richie Sambora-Stranger In This Town
Damn Yankees-Don't Tread
Poison-Native Tongue
Goo Goo Dolls-Dizzy Up The girl
Metallica-Metallica,Load,ReLoad,Garage Inc.
Queen-Innuendo
Extreme-Extreme 2.3 sides to every story
Little Texas-Big Time
ZZ Top-Recycler
The Brian SetzerOrchestra-The Dirty Boogie
Meat Loaf-Bat Out Of Hell 2
Skid Row-Slave To The Grind
Aerosmith-Get A Grip
Judas Priest-Painkiller
Widowmaker-Blood and Bullets,Stand By For Pain
Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble-The Sky is Crying
Cry of Love-Cry of Love

LoganRuckman
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Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby LoganRuckman » July 30th, 2018, 6:41 am

SpaceGuitarist wrote:then there's a bunch that probably won't make any sense to people outside of Europe but still worth mentioning:

The La's - The La's
The Stairs - Mexican R'n'B
Spiritualized - Lazer Guided Melodies
Shack - Waterpistol
Super Furry Animals - the first two albums

The 90s were great if you weren't watching MTV.


Hey now, they make perfect sense to me considering I listed Teenage Fanclub and Talulah Gosh as personal favorites, which I rarely ever see anyone outside of Britain (besides me) ever mention. Beloved overseas, but no one cares about them in America. Lot's of great '70s, '80s, and '90s indie/alternative/punk bands are overlooked over here while being icons across the pond. The Undertones, The Pastels, Stone Roses, Happy Mondays, Ride, The Shop Assistants, Lush, etc. spring to mind.

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SpaceGuitarist
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Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby SpaceGuitarist » July 30th, 2018, 9:56 am

LoganRuckman wrote:Hey now, they make perfect sense to me considering I listed Teenage Fanclub and Talulah Gosh as personal favorites, which I rarely ever see anyone outside of Britain (besides me) ever mention. Beloved overseas, but no one cares about them in America. Lot's of great '70s, '80s, and '90s indie/alternative/punk bands are overlooked over here while being icons across the pond. The Undertones, The Pastels, Stone Roses, Happy Mondays, Ride, The Shop Assistants, Lush, etc. spring to mind.


Teenage Fanclub, The Stone Roses, Ride, Happy Mondays...these were some of my favourite bands growing up!! I was really into that Madchester/Creation Records stuff. Also loved The Undertones, The Jam and all that wave of 60s-inspired punk. In the late 90s there were a few American bands who could beat the Brits at their own game though - Cotton Mather (from Austin TX I think) were a great Beatles-esque trio and in San Francisco there were the Brian Jonestown Massacre and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (although I think BRMC are from 2001). I'm neither british nor american, so all this stuff to me was "foreign", regardless of where it originated.

I was surprised when I learnt that Jonathan Richman wasn't popular in the US, even in his native Boston. Not that he's a celebrity over here, but most music enthusiasts at least have heard of his band The Modern Lovers. Anybody in the US seemed to know Donovan's "Wear Your Love Like Heaven" though, which really made me laugh because I don't think I could name a song more european than that!!

Speaking of classic songwriters, Joni Mitchell's Turbulent Indigo ('94) and Bob Dylan's Time Out of Mind ('97) are worth mentioning if only because they were unexpected returns to form.

I honestly don't think we ever got a "bad" decade of music, except the one we're living now. And it's not that there's no good music being made today...there has to be, but it's just that the (digital) distribution model makes it really painful and time consuming to discover it. Back in the day I would go to the record shop and see the new releases, or get a magazine and read the reviews or simply listen to some independent radio stations. Nowadays, all the good, authentic music seem to be made by independent bands on bandcamp and nobody seems to be aware of it. But if I had to explore all the stuff on bandcamp just to find something that sounds pleasing to my ears, I wouldn't have the time to do anything else...

we should have a thread like this for 60s/70s music...that would be a lot of fun...

rockofhysteria
Posts: 111
Joined: October 27th, 2016, 7:49 pm

Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby rockofhysteria » July 30th, 2018, 11:34 am

SpaceGuitarist wrote:
LoganRuckman wrote:Hey now, they make perfect sense to me considering I listed Teenage Fanclub and Talulah Gosh as personal favorites, which I rarely ever see anyone outside of Britain (besides me) ever mention. Beloved overseas, but no one cares about them in America. Lot's of great '70s, '80s, and '90s indie/alternative/punk bands are overlooked over here while being icons across the pond. The Undertones, The Pastels, Stone Roses, Happy Mondays, Ride, The Shop Assistants, Lush, etc. spring to mind.


Teenage Fanclub, The Stone Roses, Ride, Happy Mondays...these were some of my favourite bands growing up!! I was really into that Madchester/Creation Records stuff. Also loved The Undertones, The Jam and all that wave of 60s-inspired punk. In the late 90s there were a few American bands who could beat the Brits at their own game though - Cotton Mather (from Austin TX I think) were a great Beatles-esque trio and in San Francisco there were the Brian Jonestown Massacre and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (although I think BRMC are from 2001). I'm neither british nor american, so all this stuff to me was "foreign", regardless of where it originated.

I was surprised when I learnt that Jonathan Richman wasn't popular in the US, even in his native Boston. Not that he's a celebrity over here, but most music enthusiasts at least have heard of his band The Modern Lovers. Anybody in the US seemed to know Donovan's "Wear Your Love Like Heaven" though, which really made me laugh because I don't think I could name a song more european than that!!

Speaking of classic songwriters, Joni Mitchell's Turbulent Indigo ('94) and Bob Dylan's Time Out of Mind ('97) are worth mentioning if only because they were unexpected returns to form.

I honestly don't think we ever got a "bad" decade of music, except the one we're living now. And it's not that there's no good music being made today...there has to be, but it's just that the (digital) distribution model makes it really painful and time consuming to discover it. Back in the day I would go to the record shop and see the new releases, or get a magazine and read the reviews or simply listen to some independent radio stations. Nowadays, all the good, authentic music seem to be made by independent bands on bandcamp and nobody seems to be aware of it. But if I had to explore all the stuff on bandcamp just to find something that sounds pleasing to my ears, I wouldn't have the time to do anything else...

we should have a thread like this for 60s/70s music...that would be a lot of fun...



As far as new music goes it really depends on what Genre you are into. Youtube is a great help to discover new music even from Classic Rock artists People are posting their new stuff there regularly to help get it out there. One of the biggest doing it is Frontiers Records who have taken up the Mantle to Keep Classic Melodic Hard Rock going and they are onstantly promoting their artists all over Social Media whether it's FB or Twitter and Youtube.

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scotland
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Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby scotland » July 30th, 2018, 12:30 pm

Just as an aside, remember digital distribution is not the first music distribution revolution. In WWII, vinyl took over as the material for phonograph records, and recording and phonograph tech improved. The jukebox explosion in the 50s. AM radio, then Border blaster AM in the 60s and then the rise of FM. MTV in the 80s, etc.

jon
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Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby jon » July 30th, 2018, 9:29 pm

One album I'll add is Rancid's And Out Come The Wolves. One thing that fascinates me about this album is the time period it came out, in mid 1995. It seemed to me like this was exactly the point where Rock and roll died. Come late '95 alternative rock got way too lightweight and boring. Bands like Space Hog (maybe not the best example, they were ok) and Marcy Playground became the biggest acts of this terrible time. Do people even remember how bad alt rock was by 1996-1997. I remember some time it must have been in late '95 or early '96 these kids at school were listening to that Space Hog album and talking about how great it was. Even then I remember thinking, boy has alt rock gone soft. I remember very clearly what alternative rock meant in 1991, and it was nothing like 1997.

LoganRuckman
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Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby LoganRuckman » July 30th, 2018, 11:17 pm

jon wrote:One album I'll add is Rancid's And Out Come The Wolves. One thing that fascinates me about this album is the time period it came out, in mid 1995. It seemed to me like this was exactly the point where Rock and roll died. Come late '95 alternative rock got way too lightweight and boring. Bands like Space Hog (maybe not the best example, they were ok) and Marcy Playground became the biggest acts of this terrible time. Do people even remember how bad alt rock was by 1996-1997. I remember some time it must have been in late '95 or early '96 these kids at school were listening to that Space Hog album and talking about how great it was. Even then I remember thinking, boy has alt rock gone soft. I remember very clearly what alternative rock meant in 1991, and it was nothing like 1997.


But it was an awesome time period for pop punk, power pop, emo, and metalcore.

newmodelarmy
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Joined: January 16th, 2017, 8:10 pm

Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby newmodelarmy » July 31st, 2018, 4:42 am

I think the 80's is the best music in the history of the planet! However, I grew up during that awesome decade so of course, that is a huge influence on my opinion. As far as the 90's go there was some great music that came out of that decade as well. My favorite band from that era is probably Stone Temple Pilots. I just went nuts for their debut album. Also throw in albums from PJ, Nirvana, Matchbox 20, etc. and you have a decent decade of music.

LoganRuckman
Posts: 245
Joined: April 10th, 2015, 1:04 am

Re: Favorite Albums of the 90s

Postby LoganRuckman » July 31st, 2018, 6:38 am

Stalvern wrote:There's a very real reason for the decline that jon has been talking about. 1996 is when American radio was deregulated to essentially allow ClearChannel to take over the airwaves wholesale. The astounding, incestuous degree of homogenization since then in what gets radio play is no accident at all, and we have a Republican Congress and Bill Clinton to thank for it.

But enough about such dreary things. I meant to post my favorite '90s albums months ago but couldn't work out a list that I was happy with – better late than never! (Yes, I know I've posted a few of these before.)

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1. Kaddish, by Towering Inferno (1993) (sample)

A beautiful and terrible album about the Holocaust. Originally conceived as the score to an elaborate stage production.

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2. Шабаш, by Алиса (1991) (sample)

Enormous Russian live-ish album (it's a studio album built on concert recordings) released right before the USSR's dissolution.

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3. Soundtracks for the Blind, by Swans (1996) (sample)

The final Swans album before their comeback many years later, a grand panorama of grief edited together bit by bit from years' worth of archived recordings.

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4. Neverhood Songs, by Terry S. Taylor (1996) (sample)

Brilliant music from a brilliant game.

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5. The Tao of Mad Phat, by Steve Coleman (1993) (sample)

The state of the art of jazz in the '90s. Relentlessly complex yet full of fiery energy.

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6. Florecer, by Sisai (1995) (entire album because nobody's uploaded individual songs)

Lovely Peruvian folk music. Proceeds from its sales went to a Quechua cultural preservation fund.

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7. Vision Creation Newsun, by Boredoms (1999) (sample)

A crazed rush into outer space. The pinnacle of Boredoms' studio work.

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8. De la Soul Is Dead, by De la Soul (1991) (sample)

A great big kaleidoscope of a rap album, silly and serious in equal measure.

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9. Whiskey for the Holy Ghost, Mark Lanegan (1994) (sample)

Heavy, emotional music from a man with one of the most badass voices ever.

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10. LP5, by Autechre (1998) (sample)

Computer jazz? I love it, whatever it is.


Very interesting list. I like it. Cool to see another Boredoms fan on here. I should check out that Mark Lanegan album, as I love Sweet Oblivion by Screaming Trees.


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