What happened to guitar rock?

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VideoGameCritic
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Re: What happened to guitar rock?

Postby VideoGameCritic » June 14th, 2020, 10:22 am

A coworker of mine was a HUGE Clutch fan. I feel like I should give them a try since they are from Maryland. They have a lot of albums - which would be recommend starting with?

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velcrozombie
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Re: What happened to guitar rock?

Postby velcrozombie » June 14th, 2020, 1:40 pm

VideoGameCritic wrote:A coworker of mine was a HUGE Clutch fan. I feel like I should give them a try since they are from Maryland. They have a lot of albums - which would be recommend starting with?


The 1995 self-titled album is usually where most people start. This album created the style of heavy, blues-based grooves that was the band's bread-and-butter for nearly a decade and it has "Spacegrass", the band's signature song (although Clutch has at least one or two fan favorites from every album - they don't have one album that defines their career the way some bands do).

Other albums to check out would be 2005's Robot Hive/Exodus (where the band got a full-time organist/keyboard player and delved a bit further into funk and blues), 2013's Earth Rocker (where they became a more driving, energetic rock band after touring with Motorhead and Thin Lizzy) and 1993's Transnational Speedway League (the rawest, angriest thing they ever put out). One thing that all Clutch albums have is a sense of humor - the songs aren't jokes exactly but they are often about absurd topics. For instance, the new album has a song ("Hot Bottom Feeder") where the lyrics consist of a recipe for Maryland crab cakes. The song "Elephant Riders" is an alternate-history story of the Civil War where the Confederacy uses elephants as cavalry mounts. There's a strong Southern flavor in general.

Try to see them live if this COVID-19 business ever clears up. I saw them in Pittsburgh with Primus a few years ago and their energy and onstage chemistry took me by surprise. Neil Fallon sounds just as good as he does on the albums and has an amicable, blue-collar sort of stage presence.


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