2020/1/28: Playstation 4: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

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VideoGameCritic
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Re: 2020/1/28: Playstation 4: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

Postby VideoGameCritic » January 29th, 2020, 6:05 pm

Thanks for the great feedback guys! Sounds like I nailed this one. I fixed the typo.

Cafeman-
I know which part you're talking about - it's probably the most trying part of the game. I had to backtrack through a lot of old areas but somehow I found it. It seems like the game picked up steam after that.

VGC

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Re: 2020/1/28: Playstation 4: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

Postby GTS » January 30th, 2020, 6:40 am

MSR1701 wrote:
C64_Critic wrote:The important thing is that it shipped in time to coincide with the release of the new SW movie. Bugs can always be 'squashed' post-release :-)

This is a VERY true statement...

I've been rereading old copies of Retro Gamer and it is interesting to read on high profile licenced games such as Disney's Aladdin and Lion King, where the game had to be designed, coded, tested and vetted for approval (which checked for bugs, playability and such) to make a tight release window with an event (in the case of those two games, the VHS release). For Disney's Aladdin, the normal vetting of Sega of Japan, Sega of Europe and Sega of America tested the game at the same time instead of one after the other, which was a very odd process.

The crutch of downloadable patches for developers and publishers means a break for getting the game out, at the cost of the consumer's enjoyment. Another example of this would be SNK's Heroine Tag Team Frenzy on the Switch has a *3GB* patch to bring performance up to par with the other versions...


You are comparing the testing process of modern games to the testing of Genesis games. That's apples to oranges. Today's games are thousands of times more complex and take years to develop. They have beta testing with thousands of players, but that still isn't enough to catch everything. The idea that the developers are being lazy and using patching as a crutch doesn't hold water. They want their game to be perfect at launch, and want positive reviews. Broken games like SimCity in 2013 pay the price for being buggy and unplayable at launch.

Producing a patch patch to repair bugs is not a sin against nature. It's easy for the player to do, and it's nice to have a game still supported after launch.

Sometimes patches are abused though. I believe some copies of Crash Trilogy only had 2 of the 3 games. You had to download the third game. That IS a sin against nature.

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Re: 2020/1/28: Playstation 4: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

Postby MSR1701 » January 30th, 2020, 10:59 am

GTS wrote:
MSR1701 wrote:
C64_Critic wrote:The important thing is that it shipped in time to coincide with the release of the new SW movie. Bugs can always be 'squashed' post-release :-)

This is a VERY true statement...

I've been rereading old copies of Retro Gamer and it is interesting to read on high profile licenced games such as Disney's Aladdin and Lion King, where the game had to be designed, coded, tested and vetted for approval (which checked for bugs, playability and such) to make a tight release window with an event (in the case of those two games, the VHS release). For Disney's Aladdin, the normal vetting of Sega of Japan, Sega of Europe and Sega of America tested the game at the same time instead of one after the other, which was a very odd process.

The crutch of downloadable patches for developers and publishers means a break for getting the game out, at the cost of the consumer's enjoyment. Another example of this would be SNK's Heroine Tag Team Frenzy on the Switch has a *3GB* patch to bring performance up to par with the other versions...


You are comparing the testing process of modern games to the testing of Genesis games. That's apples to oranges. Today's games are thousands of times more complex and take years to develop. They have beta testing with thousands of players, but that still isn't enough to catch everything. The idea that the developers are being lazy and using patching as a crutch doesn't hold water. They want their game to be perfect at launch, and want positive reviews. Broken games like SimCity in 2013 pay the price for being buggy and unplayable at launch.

Producing a patch patch to repair bugs is not a sin against nature. It's easy for the player to do, and it's nice to have a game still supported after launch.

Sometimes patches are abused though. I believe some copies of Crash Trilogy only had 2 of the 3 games. You had to download the third game. That IS a sin against nature.


Very good points. SimCity was buggy and unplayable, and if I recall correctly there were server connection issues akin to what Diablo 3 went through.


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