Is it normal for a legitimate Nintendo cartridge to have the version numbers on the back spaced this far apart

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Verm3
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Joined: April 23rd, 2015, 8:41 am

Re: Is it normal for a legitimate Nintendo cartridge to have the version numbers on the back spaced this far apart

Postby Verm3 » May 12th, 2019, 1:01 am

Thanks for all the responses.

My concern was that 99.9% of my N64 cartridges have the factory stamped numbers in the top right corner close together, like the grey cartridge in my image. But that a couple have the factory stamped numbers further apart like the black cartridge in my image.

I looked up an unrelated SNES game on Ebay that mine has the factory numbers stamped a distance apart like the black N64 cartridge and found every copy that had a photo of the back of the cartridge has the numbers stamped close together like the grey cartridge.

So I am wondering if my cartridges with the numbers stamped further apart (i.e like the black cartridge in my image) are bootlegs of unknown age (I've had the black cartridge for many years)?


Verm3
Posts: 96
Joined: April 23rd, 2015, 8:41 am

Re: Is it normal for a legitimate Nintendo cartridge to have the version numbers on the back spaced this far apart

Postby Verm3 » May 12th, 2019, 1:35 am

Doom for the SNES, which I purchased recently. The box and manual look authentic.

The black N64 cartridge is loose Turok 2 cartridge, which I've had for many many years.

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Stalvern
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Joined: June 18th, 2016, 7:15 pm

Re: Is it normal for a legitimate Nintendo cartridge to have the version numbers on the back spaced this far apart

Postby Stalvern » May 12th, 2019, 1:55 am

I wouldn't worry about either, then. The complete packaging for Doom is enough evidence for me that it's legitimate, and nobody in their right mind would bother to counterfeit Turok 2.

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Matchstick
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Joined: October 26th, 2017, 6:45 am

Re: Is it normal for a legitimate Nintendo cartridge to have the version numbers on the back spaced this far apart

Postby Matchstick » May 12th, 2019, 10:52 pm

Stalvern wrote:I wouldn't worry about either, then. The complete packaging for Doom is enough evidence for me that it's legitimate, and nobody in their right mind would bother to counterfeit Turok 2.


Great point here. While there are plenty of repros floating around out there, most are for very, very rare games. Even Doom for the SNES isn't all that rare or hard to find, and since it uses the uncommon Super FX 2 chip inside, any reproduction of the game would be very difficult, and costly, to duplicate. Many of the counterfeiters out there are looking to duplicate rare games with simple internal architecture, which is why Aero Fighters and Ninja Gaiden trilogy for the SNES are pretty popular reproduction cartridges. I don't know if any pirates have managed to crack Doom on the SNES yet, but for most of them, it just wouldn't be worth it financially to do so.

Want to really put your mind at ease? Spend $5 or so on eBay or Amazon and buy yourself a GameBit, a tool for your screwdriver that will allow you to open your cartridges and look inside them for yourself. It's a small investment that will pay for itself if you ever need to replace a save battery and will also help put your mind at ease in potential piracy situations such as these. For all the time and effort you've spent posting here, you could have already opened up your cartridges and seen for yourself if they were legitimate or not. A worthy investment.

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Rev
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Joined: April 7th, 2015, 7:31 pm

Re: Is it normal for a legitimate Nintendo cartridge to have the version numbers on the back spaced this far apart

Postby Rev » May 13th, 2019, 5:13 pm

Honestly, there is a market for making fake games of all rarity; however, I would agree that most people who make fakes are looking to pass off really rare games as real. Doom isn't even that cheap of a game, going for about $25 loose and about $80+ for a complete copy. but like Matchstick said I doubt Doom was faked since it did have a special chip, but it wouldn't surprise me if there are fakes going around for it.

Just like any person who makes fake goods, how good of a fake is going to depend on the skill of the maker. I have seen games that I have sworn were real, which passed all the usual outside tests, be fake once you opened them up. Really, the only way you're going to know 100% if a game is real or not is to open it up and check out the circuit board.

It's also pretty hard to know for sure if different fonts or spacings on a game are actually legit or not. Depending on the game, it may have had several runs so there might be slight differences between versions. Old games sometimes even had updates implemented on newer versions of the game. A classic example, is Revenge of Shinobi for the Genesis, which depending on the version the bosses are different.

In addition, maybe the game is legit and it is just the sticker that was added afterwards. It isn't very uncommon anymore for people to buy new labels to place on their cartridges, especially if the original is in bad shape. If it was traded between several collectors, it wouldn't be surprising that, that information was not communicated at one point.

If you are unable to buy a bit screw I would recommend searching for authentic pictures on Google to see if there any noticeable differences on the game. But once again, you wouldn't really know 100% until you opened it up.


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