Most "collectible" system?

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JustLikeHeaven1
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Joined: December 31st, 1969, 7:00 pm

Most "collectible" system?

Postby JustLikeHeaven1 » December 9th, 2005, 9:44 pm

I actually sent away for a new 72 pin connector back in highschool (6-7 years ago) and it was kind of a pain to install myself.  Yet my NES works like new and I can't complain.  Best five bucks I've ever spent!

Sketch Turner

Most "collectible" system?

Postby Sketch Turner » December 9th, 2005, 10:15 pm

[QUOTE=JustLikeHeaven] On the other hand the library for the PS1 is frickin HUGE....pretty much to the point where you have to know exactly what you want or else you could end up with a worthless disc that will one day serve as a fully functional drink coaster. [/QUOTE]
That's exactly why many gamers have something against the PS1/2. And those trash-rag game magazines don't make things any better. There are awesome games for the PS2, it's just not always easy to know what they are. There's so much junk that it can overshadow the great. There are so many great niche titles for the ps1/2, but you have to have good sources of info to dig it up. For every lame game, there is a cool game like Top Shop or Sol Divide.

bbruzzes

Most "collectible" system?

Postby bbruzzes » December 10th, 2005, 12:06 pm

[QUOTE=Sketch Turner]One issue with old games is dead save battery. If you get a game for an oldschool system, make sure it either doesn't save or it has a password. It turns out that companies who put passwords in games had great foresight. [/QUOTE]

If you get a dead save battery you can buy a security bit set on eBay to open up the cartridges. Then get a CR2032 lithium battery (which you can get for $1 at a dollar store) and you'll be able to save your games again for years!


Sketch Turner

Most "collectible" system?

Postby Sketch Turner » December 12th, 2005, 5:29 pm

[QUOTE=bbruzzes]

[QUOTE=Sketch Turner]One issue with old games is dead save battery. If you get a game for an oldschool system, make sure it either doesn't save or it has a password. It turns out that companies who put passwords in games had great foresight. [/QUOTE]

If you get a dead save battery you can buy a security bit set on eBay to open up the cartridges. Then get a CR2032 lithium battery (which you can get for $1 at a dollar store) and you'll be able to save your games again for years!

[/QUOTE]

I've heard that requires a soldering iron, also. It sounds too risky. Are there any systems that don't require soldering to replace a battery?


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VideoGameCritic
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Most "collectible" system?

Postby VideoGameCritic » December 12th, 2005, 7:49 pm

This company will do the work for you for the price:

http://www.oldschoolgamer.ca/information.aspx?SID=16

For you SNES fans, there's a "game saver" device that runs on batteries.  Not sure if it works.



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