Album Sales Dying Fast

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pacman000
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby pacman000 » January 5th, 2019, 2:53 pm

I think this quote is relevant:

Thank you. As a tiny tiny microscopic part of the music industry - hobbyist artist/self-publisher - I keep far more of the revenue from a sale than than from someone streaming. Buy my album? You've bought me a coffee! Thanks. Stream my album? Well, only another thousand or so streams to go and I can get that same coffee...


https://entertainment.slashdot.org/comm ... d=57904300

The entertainment industry goes through periods of shifting control, from artists to distributors, then back again as soon as something new interrupts the status quo. "Something new" could be tape decks, a court decision ordering movie studios to sell off their theater chains, whatever.

Seems like we've reached the "distributor makes all the profits" part of online distribution.

jon
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby jon » January 11th, 2019, 7:22 pm

I’ve been reminiscing a lot about the late 90’s a little too. Even though the best bands were done, in say 1997-1998 there was still a music industry and thus a big rock presence on the chart. Heck even the days of bands like Foo Fighteres and Everclear bands like that ruling the charts in the late 90’s seems like a million years ago, almost like it didn’t happen so much has changed since then. There was still a sense that there were still rock stars

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SpaceGuitarist
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby SpaceGuitarist » January 15th, 2019, 6:53 am

To add insult to injury, it now seems perfectly possible to fake streaming figures so that certain artists earn more from royalties:

https://www.nme.com/news/tidal-faces-cr ... es-2430844

I mean, if artists such as Noel Gallagher (somebody with an enormous following and thirteen #1 albums in the UK) say they aren't making a penny out of streaming services, it means something's wrong, right?!

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VideoGameCritic
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby VideoGameCritic » January 15th, 2019, 6:48 pm

I find it a little hard to believe that streaming, which is comparable to the damn radio, is going to make up for all those album sales. I feel bad for musicians nowadays. The industry is going through a very awkward phase.

bluenote
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby bluenote » January 16th, 2019, 9:33 am

VideoGameCritic wrote:I find it a little hard to believe that streaming, which is comparable to the damn radio, is going to make up for all those album sales. I feel bad for musicians nowadays. The industry is going through a very awkward phase.


It's not really like the radio at all. Radio, you are subject to only hearing the songs the station puts on. With commercials and talk inbetween. And, it's only the hits you hear from an artist, no deep cuts.

Streaming, you can listen to any song or album that you can ever imagine. You can put together playlists of your own, or listen to predetermined playlists based on the genre. (this part is somewhat close to radio I guess).

For me, I still buy cds and the occassional record. I will never stop buying cds, as I like having the physical album. I've been collecting music my whole life.

However, streaming still has a place for me. When friends are over and hanging in the backyard, it's much easier to put on a streaming station and play "90s alternative stream" or whatever the mood calls for. Much better than the same old songs on the radio.

As well, I have discovered so many new bands that I never would hear otherwise. On my evening walks with my dog, I will put on an Indie rock playlist, and discover all kinds of cool new bands. When I find a band I really like, I'll go out and buy their album.

For me, I still buy cds because I find my attention span is all over the place when I have access to any band, album or song with streaming. It's almost too much choice, you know? when I buy a cd, I will give it a few listens to determine if I like it. Often times revisiting it years later, because I invested money it it and it's sitting on my cd shelf. With streaming, if I don't like something within the first minute, I skip it. I like the attention I have when I have the physical cd.

I understand why the mainstream has turned to streaming though. Why spend $15 on a cd when you can listen to it anytime you want with a monthly $10 fee? And, the sound quality is actually half decent compared to cd. In fact, there are lots of streaming companies offering fidelity comparable and greater to cd.

Streaming to me has good points and bad points. But let's face it, streaming is not going anywhere. They are too far down that rabbit hole.

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Stalvern
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby Stalvern » January 16th, 2019, 1:36 pm

bluenote wrote:It's not really like the radio at all. Radio, you are subject to only hearing the songs the station puts on. With commercials and talk inbetween. And, it's only the hits you hear from an artist, no deep cuts.

Streaming, you can listen to any song or album that you can ever imagine. You can put together playlists of your own, or listen to predetermined playlists based on the genre. (this part is somewhat close to radio I guess).

The Critic's point is that it's like radio in terms of how much the musicians get out of it: zilch.

bluenote
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby bluenote » January 16th, 2019, 3:22 pm

Stalvern wrote:
bluenote wrote:It's not really like the radio at all. Radio, you are subject to only hearing the songs the station puts on. With commercials and talk inbetween. And, it's only the hits you hear from an artist, no deep cuts.

Streaming, you can listen to any song or album that you can ever imagine. You can put together playlists of your own, or listen to predetermined playlists based on the genre. (this part is somewhat close to radio I guess).

The Critic's point is that it's like radio in terms of how much the musicians get out of it: zilch.


Ah, sorry I missed that. I thought he was comparing the listening experience to the radio. I just re-read his post and you're right.

Yea, the record industry is very different. It seems the majority of the band's income is through touring and merchandise. Not records any longer. Radio/streaming is mostly to get people to see the band live where they can the majority of their revenue.

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pacman000
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby pacman000 » January 19th, 2019, 8:52 am

We don't need another "physical media dying thread," so I'll post this here:

https://www.engadget.com/2019/01/18/emm ... d-in-2020/

The Emmy Awards are going to stop sending screener DVDs by 2020. Instead they'll use a custom streaming platform.

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VideoGameCritic
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby VideoGameCritic » January 19th, 2019, 8:01 pm

I suggest they keep the DVDs and stop screening the Emmy Awards instead.

People have grown to hate those self-congratulatory award shows.

rohoGames
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Re: Album Sales Dying Fast

Postby rohoGames » January 27th, 2019, 7:16 pm

Without a doubt streaming doesn't make money for 99% of the people on those services. Unfortunately for music it really does seem like the way to go is to give away the music in some form or fashion, and hope you can get popular enough to make money from everything else. Like ok, cool, you like my music on spotify, maybe you buy that limited run vinyl I've made or a poster or go to a live show if applicable. It's really too bad.

Entrepreneurs will always find a way, but right now it is hardest for people who just want to.... focus on making great music and releasing it as a product that sells itself, without a grand strategy. That's a bummer.


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